Long-lasting antinociceptive effects of green light in acute and chronic pain in rats

Mohab M. Ibrahim, Amol M Patwardhan, Kerry B. Gilbraith, Aubin Moutal, Xiaofang Yang, Lindsey A. Chew, Tally Largent-Milnes, T. Philip Malan, Todd W Vanderah, Frank Porreca, Rajesh Khanna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Treatments for chronic pain are inadequate, and new options are needed. Nonpharmaceutical approaches are especially attractive with many potential advantages including safety. Light therapy has been suggested to be beneficial in certain medical conditions such as depression, but this approach remains to be explored for modulation of pain. We investigated the effects of light-emitting diodes (LEDs), in the visible spectrum, on acute sensory thresholds in naive rats as well as in experimental neuropathic pain. Rats receiving green LED light (wavelength 525 nm, 8 h/d) showed significantly increased paw withdrawal latency to a noxious thermal stimulus; this antinociceptive effect persisted for 4 days after termination of last exposure without development of tolerance. No apparent side effects were noted and motor performance was not impaired. Despite LED exposure, opaque contact lenses prevented antinociception. Rats fitted with green contact lenses exposed to room light exhibited antinociception arguing for a role of the visual system. Antinociception was not due to stress/anxiety but likely due to increased enkephalins expression in the spinal cord. Naloxone reversed the antinociception, suggesting involvement of central opioid circuits. Rostral ventromedial medulla inactivation prevented expression of light-induced antinociception suggesting engagement of descending inhibition. Green LED exposure also reversed thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in rats with spinal nerve ligation. Pharmacological and proteomic profiling of dorsal root ganglion neurons from green LED-exposed rats identified changes in calcium channel activity, including a decrease in the N-type (CaV2.2) channel, a primary analgesic target. Thus, green LED therapy may represent a novel, nonpharmacological approach for managing pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-360
Number of pages14
JournalPain
Volume158
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Fingerprint

Methyl Green
Acute Pain
Chronic Pain
Light
Hyperalgesia
Contact Lenses
Sensory Thresholds
Pain
Spinal Nerves
Phototherapy
Enkephalins
Spinal Ganglia
Neuralgia
Calcium Channels
Naloxone
Proteomics
Opioid Analgesics
Ligation
Analgesics
Spinal Cord

Keywords

  • Calcium imaging
  • Constellation pharmacology
  • Green-light phototherapy
  • Mechanical allodynia
  • Neuropathic pain
  • Proteomics
  • Thermal antinociception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Long-lasting antinociceptive effects of green light in acute and chronic pain in rats. / Ibrahim, Mohab M.; Patwardhan, Amol M; Gilbraith, Kerry B.; Moutal, Aubin; Yang, Xiaofang; Chew, Lindsey A.; Largent-Milnes, Tally; Malan, T. Philip; Vanderah, Todd W; Porreca, Frank; Khanna, Rajesh.

In: Pain, Vol. 158, No. 2, 01.02.2017, p. 347-360.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ibrahim, MM, Patwardhan, AM, Gilbraith, KB, Moutal, A, Yang, X, Chew, LA, Largent-Milnes, T, Malan, TP, Vanderah, TW, Porreca, F & Khanna, R 2017, 'Long-lasting antinociceptive effects of green light in acute and chronic pain in rats', Pain, vol. 158, no. 2, pp. 347-360. https://doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000767
Ibrahim, Mohab M. ; Patwardhan, Amol M ; Gilbraith, Kerry B. ; Moutal, Aubin ; Yang, Xiaofang ; Chew, Lindsey A. ; Largent-Milnes, Tally ; Malan, T. Philip ; Vanderah, Todd W ; Porreca, Frank ; Khanna, Rajesh. / Long-lasting antinociceptive effects of green light in acute and chronic pain in rats. In: Pain. 2017 ; Vol. 158, No. 2. pp. 347-360.
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