Long-term graft patency (3 years) after coronary artery surgery. Effects of aspirin: Results of a VA cooperative study

Steven Goldman, Jack Copeland, Thomas Moritz, William Henderson, Karen Zadina, Theron Ovitt, Karl B Kern, Gulshan Sethi, G. V R K Sharma, Shukri Khuri, Kent Richards, Fred Grover, Douglass Morrison, Glenn Whitman, Elliot Chesler, Y. Sako, Ivan Pacold, Alvaro Montoya, Henry DeMots, Storm FlotenJames Doherty, Raymond Read, Stewart Scott, Ted Spooner, Zaki Masud, Clair Haakenson, Tai Kim, Laurence A. Harker

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Abstract

Background: The long-term success of coronary bypass surgery is dependent on graft patency after surgery. This trial was designed to determine if aspirin improved saphenous vein graft or internal mammary artery (IMA) graft patency between 1 and 3 years after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Methods and Results: After receiving aspirin 325 mg/d for 1 year after CABG and undergoing a 1-year postoperative cardiac catheterization, patients were randomized to receive either aspirin (325 mg) or placebo for 2 additional years. Angiography was performed 3 years after surgery to determine the primary end point-saphenous vein graft patency in 288 patients and IMA graft patency in 167 patients. At 3 years after CABG, the saphenous vein graft occlusion rate was 17.0% (62 of 365) for patients treated with aspirin compared with 19.7% (74 of 376) for those who received placebo (P=.404). For saphenous vein grafts that were patent at 1 year, the occlusion rate at 3 years was 4.8% (15 of 313) for patients treated with aspirin compared with 4.2% (13 of 310) for patients who received placebo (P=.757). At 3 years, the IMA graft occlusion rate was 10.3% (8 of 78) for patients treated with aspirin compared with 7.9% (7 of 89) for patients who received placebo (P=.594). For IMA grafts that were patent at 1 year, the occlusion rate was 4.3% (3 of 70) for patients treated with aspirin compared with 2.5% (2 of 81) for patients who received placebo (P=.541). Conclusions: These data suggest that aspirin treatment does not improve saphenous vein graft or IMA graft patency between 1 and 3 years after CABG.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1138-1143
Number of pages6
JournalCirculation
Volume89
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1994

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Aspirin
Coronary Vessels
Transplants
Mammary Arteries
Saphenous Vein
Coronary Artery Bypass
Placebos
Cardiac Catheterization
Angiography

Keywords

  • Aspirin
  • Grafts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Goldman, S., Copeland, J., Moritz, T., Henderson, W., Zadina, K., Ovitt, T., ... Harker, L. A. (1994). Long-term graft patency (3 years) after coronary artery surgery. Effects of aspirin: Results of a VA cooperative study. Circulation, 89(3), 1138-1143.

Long-term graft patency (3 years) after coronary artery surgery. Effects of aspirin : Results of a VA cooperative study. / Goldman, Steven; Copeland, Jack; Moritz, Thomas; Henderson, William; Zadina, Karen; Ovitt, Theron; Kern, Karl B; Sethi, Gulshan; Sharma, G. V R K; Khuri, Shukri; Richards, Kent; Grover, Fred; Morrison, Douglass; Whitman, Glenn; Chesler, Elliot; Sako, Y.; Pacold, Ivan; Montoya, Alvaro; DeMots, Henry; Floten, Storm; Doherty, James; Read, Raymond; Scott, Stewart; Spooner, Ted; Masud, Zaki; Haakenson, Clair; Kim, Tai; Harker, Laurence A.

In: Circulation, Vol. 89, No. 3, 03.1994, p. 1138-1143.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goldman, S, Copeland, J, Moritz, T, Henderson, W, Zadina, K, Ovitt, T, Kern, KB, Sethi, G, Sharma, GVRK, Khuri, S, Richards, K, Grover, F, Morrison, D, Whitman, G, Chesler, E, Sako, Y, Pacold, I, Montoya, A, DeMots, H, Floten, S, Doherty, J, Read, R, Scott, S, Spooner, T, Masud, Z, Haakenson, C, Kim, T & Harker, LA 1994, 'Long-term graft patency (3 years) after coronary artery surgery. Effects of aspirin: Results of a VA cooperative study', Circulation, vol. 89, no. 3, pp. 1138-1143.
Goldman, Steven ; Copeland, Jack ; Moritz, Thomas ; Henderson, William ; Zadina, Karen ; Ovitt, Theron ; Kern, Karl B ; Sethi, Gulshan ; Sharma, G. V R K ; Khuri, Shukri ; Richards, Kent ; Grover, Fred ; Morrison, Douglass ; Whitman, Glenn ; Chesler, Elliot ; Sako, Y. ; Pacold, Ivan ; Montoya, Alvaro ; DeMots, Henry ; Floten, Storm ; Doherty, James ; Read, Raymond ; Scott, Stewart ; Spooner, Ted ; Masud, Zaki ; Haakenson, Clair ; Kim, Tai ; Harker, Laurence A. / Long-term graft patency (3 years) after coronary artery surgery. Effects of aspirin : Results of a VA cooperative study. In: Circulation. 1994 ; Vol. 89, No. 3. pp. 1138-1143.
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T1 - Long-term graft patency (3 years) after coronary artery surgery. Effects of aspirin

T2 - Results of a VA cooperative study

AU - Goldman, Steven

AU - Copeland, Jack

AU - Moritz, Thomas

AU - Henderson, William

AU - Zadina, Karen

AU - Ovitt, Theron

AU - Kern, Karl B

AU - Sethi, Gulshan

AU - Sharma, G. V R K

AU - Khuri, Shukri

AU - Richards, Kent

AU - Grover, Fred

AU - Morrison, Douglass

AU - Whitman, Glenn

AU - Chesler, Elliot

AU - Sako, Y.

AU - Pacold, Ivan

AU - Montoya, Alvaro

AU - DeMots, Henry

AU - Floten, Storm

AU - Doherty, James

AU - Read, Raymond

AU - Scott, Stewart

AU - Spooner, Ted

AU - Masud, Zaki

AU - Haakenson, Clair

AU - Kim, Tai

AU - Harker, Laurence A.

PY - 1994/3

Y1 - 1994/3

N2 - Background: The long-term success of coronary bypass surgery is dependent on graft patency after surgery. This trial was designed to determine if aspirin improved saphenous vein graft or internal mammary artery (IMA) graft patency between 1 and 3 years after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Methods and Results: After receiving aspirin 325 mg/d for 1 year after CABG and undergoing a 1-year postoperative cardiac catheterization, patients were randomized to receive either aspirin (325 mg) or placebo for 2 additional years. Angiography was performed 3 years after surgery to determine the primary end point-saphenous vein graft patency in 288 patients and IMA graft patency in 167 patients. At 3 years after CABG, the saphenous vein graft occlusion rate was 17.0% (62 of 365) for patients treated with aspirin compared with 19.7% (74 of 376) for those who received placebo (P=.404). For saphenous vein grafts that were patent at 1 year, the occlusion rate at 3 years was 4.8% (15 of 313) for patients treated with aspirin compared with 4.2% (13 of 310) for patients who received placebo (P=.757). At 3 years, the IMA graft occlusion rate was 10.3% (8 of 78) for patients treated with aspirin compared with 7.9% (7 of 89) for patients who received placebo (P=.594). For IMA grafts that were patent at 1 year, the occlusion rate was 4.3% (3 of 70) for patients treated with aspirin compared with 2.5% (2 of 81) for patients who received placebo (P=.541). Conclusions: These data suggest that aspirin treatment does not improve saphenous vein graft or IMA graft patency between 1 and 3 years after CABG.

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KW - Aspirin

KW - Grafts

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