Long-term outcome after pancreas transplantation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of review: Pancreas transplantation provides the only proven method to restore long-term normoglycemia in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Although many studies describe the very important risk factors for short-term survival of a pancreas transplant, there is not a lot of information available about factors that distinguish short-term from long-term graft function. Recent findings: The analysis of 18159 pancreas transplants from the International Pancreas Transplant Registry, performed from 25 July 1978 to 31 December 2005, showed an improvement not only in short-term but also in long-term graft function. Most recent 5-year, 10-year and 20-year graft function for transplants with the appropriate follow-up time showed 80, 68 and 45%, respectively, for simultaneous pancreas/kidney transplants; 62, 46 and 16%, respectively, for pancreas after kidney; and 59, 39 and 12%, respectively, for pancreas transplants alone. Important factors influencing long-term function were factors that described the quality of the deceased donor. Pancreas transplants in younger or African-American recipients showed a higher risk of graft failure. Anti-T-cell induction therapy had a significant impact on long-term survival in solitary transplants. Summary: With a careful donor selection, not only short-term but also long-term pancreas graft function and, therefore, good metabolic control can be achieved for the diabetic patient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-105
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Organ Transplantation
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2012

Fingerprint

Pancreas Transplantation
Transplants
Pancreas
Kidney
Donor Selection
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
African Americans
Registries

Keywords

  • deceased donor factors
  • long-term graft function
  • pancreas graft function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Long-term outcome after pancreas transplantation. / Gruessner, Angelika C; Sutherland, David E R; Gruessner, Rainer W G.

In: Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation, Vol. 17, No. 1, 02.2012, p. 100-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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