Longitudinal association between short sleep, body weight, and emotional and learning problems in hispanic and caucasian children

Graciela E. Silva, James L. Goodwin, Sairam Parthasarathy, Duane L Sherrill, Kimberly D. Vana, Amy A. Drescher, Stuart F Quan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study Objective: To determine the impact of lower amounts of childhood sleep assessed by polysomnogram on development of obesity, being anxious or depressed, or having learning problems 5 years later. Design: Prospective cohort. Participants: Subjects were 304 community participants from the Tucson Children's Assessment of Sleep Apnea study, aged 6-12 years old at baseline. Measurements and Results: Children were classified according to baseline sleep as those who slept ≥ 9 h/night, those who slept > 7.5 to < 9 h/ night, and those who slept ≤ 7.5 h/night. Odds of overweight/obese (≥ 85 th BMI percentile), obese (≥ 95th BMI percentile), anxious or depressed, and learning problems at follow-up were assessed according to baseline sleep categories. Children who slept ≤ 7.5 h/night had higher odds of being obese (OR = 3.3, P < 0.05) at follow-up than children who slept ≥ 9 h/night. Borderline significance for overweight/obese (OR = 2.2, P < 0.1), anxious or depressed (OR = 3.3, P < 0.1), and having learning problems (OR = 11.1, P < 0.1) were seen for children who slept ≤ 7.5 h/night as compared to those who slept ≥ 9 h/night. A mean increase in BMI of 1.7 kg/m 2 (P = 0.01) over the 5 years of follow-up was seen for children who slept ≤ 7.5 h/night compared to those who slept ≥ 9 h/night. These relationships did not differ between Hispanic and Caucasian children. Conclusions: Children with reduced amounts of sleep (≤ 7.5 h/night) had an increased risk for higher body weight in early adolescence. Similarly, children who slept ≤ 7.5 h/night had higher risk of being anxious or depressed or having learning problems in early adolescence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1197-1205
Number of pages9
JournalSleep
Volume34
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2011

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Childhood
  • Obesity
  • Sleep time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

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