Longitudinal dyadic interdependence in psychological distress among Latinas with breast cancer and their caregivers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Cancer diagnosis and treatment can generate substantial distress for both survivors and their family caregivers. The primary aim of this investigation is to test a model of dyadic interdependence in distress experienced by cancer survivors and their caregivers to determine if each influences the other. Methods: To test this prediction, 209 Latinas with breast cancer and their family caregivers (dyads) were followed for 4 waves of assessment over the course of 6 months. Both psychological (depression, anxiety, perceived stress) and physical (number of symptoms, symptom distress) indicators of distress were assessed. Longitudinal analyses of dyadic data were performed in accordance with the actor-partner interdependence model. Results: Findings indicated that psychological distress was interdependent between cancer survivors and their caregivers over the 6 months of observation. However, there was no such evidence of interdependence on indicators of physical distress. Conclusions: These findings are consistent with emotional contagion processes and point to the potential importance of caregiver well-being for the welfare of Latina breast cancer survivors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2735-2743
Number of pages9
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2020

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Breast cancer
  • Caregivers
  • Depression
  • Interdependence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Longitudinal dyadic interdependence in psychological distress among Latinas with breast cancer and their caregivers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this