Looking good versus feeling good: An investigation of media frames of health advice and their effects on women's body-related self-perceptions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present research had two goals: (1) to document how health advice is framed on the covers of women's health magazines, and (2) to investigate whether exposure to appearance frames (i.e., do something in order to look better) affected women's body-related self-perceptions compared to health frames (i.e., to do something in order to feel better). Study 1, a content analysis of 426 cover headlines on the five highest-circulating women's health magazines in the United States, revealed that appearance frames were just as prevalent as health frames. Study 2, an experiment conducted on 103 U. S. undergraduate women, showed that those assigned to appearance frames reported more body shame and appearance-related motivation to exercise than women assigned to health frames.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)50-63
Number of pages14
JournalSex Roles
Volume63
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 7 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Body shame
  • Framing
  • Health advice
  • Health magazines
  • Self-objectification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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