Loss of spontaneous blinking in a patient with Balint's syndrome

R. T. Watson, Steven Z Rapcsak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A patient with Balint's syndrome caused by bilateral parieto-occipital lesions lost spontaneous blinking, suggesting that humans, like nonhuman primates, have parietal lobe neurons that are important for blinking. Although the functions of spontaneous blinking are not known, they may help initiate some saccades and, like saccades, be involved in the cancellation of thalamic inhibitory postsynaptic potentials, thereby facilitating processing of new foveal targets. Spontaneous blinking may also facilitate sensory relay during sustained attention and therefore, help prevent fading of a retinal image.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)567-570
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume46
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1989

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Blinking
Saccades
Inhibitory Postsynaptic Potentials
Parietal Lobe
Primates
Neurons
Neuron
Lesion
Nonhuman Primate
Syndrome
Retinal Image

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Loss of spontaneous blinking in a patient with Balint's syndrome. / Watson, R. T.; Rapcsak, Steven Z.

In: Archives of Neurology, Vol. 46, No. 5, 1989, p. 567-570.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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