Low-level lead exposure and contingency-based responding in preschoolers: An exploratory study

Melanie McDiarmid Nelson, Kimberly Andrews Espy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two reversal paradigm tasks (spatial reversal and spatial reversal with irrelevant color cues) originally designed to assess contingency-based responding in primates were adapted for use with 139 preschool children with a mean peak blood lead level (BLL) of 4.2 g/dl (SD = 2.2). Sixty-nine children with BLL 5 g/dl and 70 children with BLL of 5 g/dl were included. Results indicated that preschool children with low-level lead exposure take longer to learn associations than preschool children with very low levels of lead exposure, and this difference cannot be attributed to increased distractibility or perseverative responding. These results support the use of these measures to assess specific cognitive functions in preschool children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)494-506
Number of pages13
JournalDevelopmental Neuropsychology
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Preschool Children
Cognition
Primates
Cues
Color
Lead

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Low-level lead exposure and contingency-based responding in preschoolers : An exploratory study. / Nelson, Melanie McDiarmid; Espy, Kimberly Andrews.

In: Developmental Neuropsychology, Vol. 34, No. 4, 07.2009, p. 494-506.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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