Low to moderate alcohol intake is not associated with increased mortality after breast cancer

Shirley W. Flatt, Cynthia Thomson, Ellen B. Gold, Loki Natarajan, Cheryl L. Rock, Wael K. Al-Delaimy, Ruth E. Patterson, Nazmus Saquib, Bette J. Caan, John P. Pierce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Both alcohol consumption and obesity have been linked with breast cancer morbidity and mortality. An inverse association between alcohol intake and obesity suggests possible confounding between these variables (and perhaps other factors) with breast cancer outcomes. Methods: Alcohol intake (beer, wine, spirits, and total) was examined in 3,088 women previously diagnosed and treated for breast cancer within an intervention trial that targeted vegetables, fiber, and fat but not alcohol or weight loss. Factors associated with baseline alcohol intake were included in Cox proportional hazards models for recurrence and mortality. Results: Alcohol intake was significantly associated with higher education and physical activity levels. Neither light alcohol intake nor obesity was significantly associated with breast cancer recurrence, but moderate alcohol intake >300 g/mo was protective against all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence intervals, 0.49-0.97) in a proportional hazards model adjusted for obesity. Obese women were 61% more likely to be nondrinkers than drinkers, and 76% more likely to be light drinkers than moderate/heavy drinkers. In nonobese women, alcohol intake >10 g/mo was associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence intervals, 0.51-0.91). Conclusion: Light alcohol intake, regardless of body weight, did not increase the risk of breast cancer recurrence or all-cause mortality in this cohort of middle-aged women previously diagnosed with breast cancer. Alcohol intake was associated with other favorable prognostic indicators, which may explain its apparent protective effect in nonobese women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)681-688
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010

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Alcohols
Breast Neoplasms
Mortality
Obesity
Proportional Hazards Models
Recurrence
Confidence Intervals
Light
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Wine
Alcohol Drinking
Vegetables
Weight Loss
Fats
Body Weight
Exercise
Morbidity
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Low to moderate alcohol intake is not associated with increased mortality after breast cancer. / Flatt, Shirley W.; Thomson, Cynthia; Gold, Ellen B.; Natarajan, Loki; Rock, Cheryl L.; Al-Delaimy, Wael K.; Patterson, Ruth E.; Saquib, Nazmus; Caan, Bette J.; Pierce, John P.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 19, No. 3, 03.2010, p. 681-688.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Flatt, SW, Thomson, C, Gold, EB, Natarajan, L, Rock, CL, Al-Delaimy, WK, Patterson, RE, Saquib, N, Caan, BJ & Pierce, JP 2010, 'Low to moderate alcohol intake is not associated with increased mortality after breast cancer', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 681-688. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-0927
Flatt, Shirley W. ; Thomson, Cynthia ; Gold, Ellen B. ; Natarajan, Loki ; Rock, Cheryl L. ; Al-Delaimy, Wael K. ; Patterson, Ruth E. ; Saquib, Nazmus ; Caan, Bette J. ; Pierce, John P. / Low to moderate alcohol intake is not associated with increased mortality after breast cancer. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2010 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 681-688.
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AU - Al-Delaimy, Wael K.

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N2 - Background: Both alcohol consumption and obesity have been linked with breast cancer morbidity and mortality. An inverse association between alcohol intake and obesity suggests possible confounding between these variables (and perhaps other factors) with breast cancer outcomes. Methods: Alcohol intake (beer, wine, spirits, and total) was examined in 3,088 women previously diagnosed and treated for breast cancer within an intervention trial that targeted vegetables, fiber, and fat but not alcohol or weight loss. Factors associated with baseline alcohol intake were included in Cox proportional hazards models for recurrence and mortality. Results: Alcohol intake was significantly associated with higher education and physical activity levels. Neither light alcohol intake nor obesity was significantly associated with breast cancer recurrence, but moderate alcohol intake >300 g/mo was protective against all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence intervals, 0.49-0.97) in a proportional hazards model adjusted for obesity. Obese women were 61% more likely to be nondrinkers than drinkers, and 76% more likely to be light drinkers than moderate/heavy drinkers. In nonobese women, alcohol intake >10 g/mo was associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence intervals, 0.51-0.91). Conclusion: Light alcohol intake, regardless of body weight, did not increase the risk of breast cancer recurrence or all-cause mortality in this cohort of middle-aged women previously diagnosed with breast cancer. Alcohol intake was associated with other favorable prognostic indicators, which may explain its apparent protective effect in nonobese women.

AB - Background: Both alcohol consumption and obesity have been linked with breast cancer morbidity and mortality. An inverse association between alcohol intake and obesity suggests possible confounding between these variables (and perhaps other factors) with breast cancer outcomes. Methods: Alcohol intake (beer, wine, spirits, and total) was examined in 3,088 women previously diagnosed and treated for breast cancer within an intervention trial that targeted vegetables, fiber, and fat but not alcohol or weight loss. Factors associated with baseline alcohol intake were included in Cox proportional hazards models for recurrence and mortality. Results: Alcohol intake was significantly associated with higher education and physical activity levels. Neither light alcohol intake nor obesity was significantly associated with breast cancer recurrence, but moderate alcohol intake >300 g/mo was protective against all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence intervals, 0.49-0.97) in a proportional hazards model adjusted for obesity. Obese women were 61% more likely to be nondrinkers than drinkers, and 76% more likely to be light drinkers than moderate/heavy drinkers. In nonobese women, alcohol intake >10 g/mo was associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence intervals, 0.51-0.91). Conclusion: Light alcohol intake, regardless of body weight, did not increase the risk of breast cancer recurrence or all-cause mortality in this cohort of middle-aged women previously diagnosed with breast cancer. Alcohol intake was associated with other favorable prognostic indicators, which may explain its apparent protective effect in nonobese women.

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