Magnetic properties of metallic multilayers and superlattices

Charles M Falco, Brad N. Engel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Metallic superlattices composed of magnetic and non-magnetic constituents have been of recent interest both for the fundamental physical phenomena they exhibit, as well as for potential technological applications. Modern deposition and characterization techniques provide well-controlled material systems that display a variety of phenomena such as two-dimensional behavior, interface-induced magnetic anisotropy, enhanced magnetization, and long-range coupling effects. Although the critical temperature of the magnetic constituents in these superlattices can be very high in their bulk form, large reductions in the Curie point often occur for systems composed of a few atomic layers. These dimensionality effects frequently require the use of cryogenic temperatures to reveal their limiting behavior. Recent studies of single-crystal magnetic superlattices grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPhysica B: Condensed Matter
EditorsDavid S. Betts
PublisherPubl by Elsevier Science Publ BV (North-Holland)
Pages293-298
Number of pages6
Volume169
Edition1 -4 pt 3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991
EventProceedings of the 19th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics - LT-19 - Brighton, Engl
Duration: Aug 16 1990Aug 22 1990

Other

OtherProceedings of the 19th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics - LT-19
CityBrighton, Engl
Period8/16/908/22/90

Fingerprint

Superlattices
superlattices
Metallic superlattices
Magnetic properties
Multilayers
magnetic properties
Magnetic thin films
Magnetic anisotropy
Molecular beam epitaxy
Cryogenics
Magnetization
Single crystals
cryogenic temperature
display devices
Temperature
critical temperature
molecular beam epitaxy
magnetization
anisotropy
single crystals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Falco, C. M., & Engel, B. N. (1991). Magnetic properties of metallic multilayers and superlattices. In D. S. Betts (Ed.), Physica B: Condensed Matter (1 -4 pt 3 ed., Vol. 169, pp. 293-298). Publ by Elsevier Science Publ BV (North-Holland). https://doi.org/10.1016/0921-4526(91)90242-7

Magnetic properties of metallic multilayers and superlattices. / Falco, Charles M; Engel, Brad N.

Physica B: Condensed Matter. ed. / David S. Betts. Vol. 169 1 -4 pt 3. ed. Publ by Elsevier Science Publ BV (North-Holland), 1991. p. 293-298.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Falco, CM & Engel, BN 1991, Magnetic properties of metallic multilayers and superlattices. in DS Betts (ed.), Physica B: Condensed Matter. 1 -4 pt 3 edn, vol. 169, Publ by Elsevier Science Publ BV (North-Holland), pp. 293-298, Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics - LT-19, Brighton, Engl, 8/16/90. https://doi.org/10.1016/0921-4526(91)90242-7
Falco CM, Engel BN. Magnetic properties of metallic multilayers and superlattices. In Betts DS, editor, Physica B: Condensed Matter. 1 -4 pt 3 ed. Vol. 169. Publ by Elsevier Science Publ BV (North-Holland). 1991. p. 293-298 https://doi.org/10.1016/0921-4526(91)90242-7
Falco, Charles M ; Engel, Brad N. / Magnetic properties of metallic multilayers and superlattices. Physica B: Condensed Matter. editor / David S. Betts. Vol. 169 1 -4 pt 3. ed. Publ by Elsevier Science Publ BV (North-Holland), 1991. pp. 293-298
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