Magnetic‐induction hyperthermia. Results of a 5‐year multi‐institutional national cooperative trial in advanced cancer patients

F. Kristian Storm, Harvey W. Baker, Edward F. Scanlon, Henry P. Plenk, Paul M. Meadows, Stephen C. Cohen, Carl E. Olson, John W. Thomson, Janardan D. Khandekar, Denise Roe, Anne Nizze, Donald L. Morton

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39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nine US institutions performed 14,807 Phase I‐II treatments of magnetic‐induction (Magnetrode [Henry Medical Electronics, Inc., Los Angeles, CA]) hyperthermia in 1170 adults. All had advanced tumors: 20% had untreated inoperable cancer or disease progression despite surgery (10%), radiation therapy (XRT) (3%), chemotherapy (27%), or combinations (40%); 67% had pain; and 79% had reduced activity. Eighteen percent were advanced primaries, 26% were recurrent, and 56% metastatic tumors in the head and neck (7%), body wall (7%), extremity (4%), abdominal cavity (17%), pelvis (17%), lung (15%), or liver (30%); 36% were < 5 cm and 64% ⩾5 cm. Treatments were to safe tolerance for 30 to 60 minutes for five or more treatments. Results in 960 evaluable patients were complete response 9% (1–34 months; median, 7 months), partial response 18% (1–39 months; median, 4 months), minimal response 10% (1–15 months; median, 3 months), and no change 33% (1–32 months; median, 3 months), with decreased pain in 30% and improved activity in 21%, independent of histologic type or site. Regression was dependent on treatment type and minimum temperature: heat only, 23%; heat + XRT, 60%; heat + less‐than‐standard XRT because of prior XRT failure, 39%, heat + intravenous (IV) chemotherapy, 28%; heat + same previously failed IV chemotherapy, 20%; heat + intraarterial (IA) chemotherapy, 28%; heat + same previously failed IA chemotherapy, 15%; heat + standard XRT + chemotherapy, 58%; heat + less‐than‐standard XRT + chemotherapy, 47%; < 40°C, 31%; 40 to 40.9°C, 45%; 41 to 41.9°C, 54%; 42 to 42.9°C, 47%; 43 to 43.9°C, 40%; 44 to 44.9°C, 33%; 45 to 45.9°C, 55%; 46 to 46.9°C, 63%; > 47°C, 100%. There were 49 (0.33%) skin burns and 2 systemic injuries (stomach ulcer at 1 month; lung fibrosis at 9 months). This trial indicates that localized hyperthermia has a significant role in palliation of human advanced solid cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2677-2687
Number of pages11
JournalCancer
Volume55
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 1985
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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    Storm, F. K., Baker, H. W., Scanlon, E. F., Plenk, H. P., Meadows, P. M., Cohen, S. C., Olson, C. E., Thomson, J. W., Khandekar, J. D., Roe, D., Nizze, A., & Morton, D. L. (1985). Magnetic‐induction hyperthermia. Results of a 5‐year multi‐institutional national cooperative trial in advanced cancer patients. Cancer, 55(11), 2677-2687. https://doi.org/10.1002/1097-0142(19850601)55:11<2677::AID-CNCR2820551124>3.0.CO;2-O