Maintaining the feelings of others in working memory is associated with activation of the left anterior insula and left frontal-parietal control network

Ryan Smith, Richard D Lane, Anna Alkozei, Jennifer Bao, Courtney Smith, Anna Sanova, Matthew Nettles, William Killgore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The maintenance of social/emotional information in working memory (SWM/EWM) has recently been the topic of multiple neuroimaging studies. However, some studies find that SWM/EWM involves a medial frontal-parietal network while others instead find lateral frontal-parietal activations similar to studies of verbal and visuospatial WM. In this study, we asked 26 healthy volunteers to complete an EWM task designed to examine whether different cognitive strategies- maintaining emotional images, words, or feelings- might account for these discrepant results. We also examined whether differences in EWM performance were related to general intelligence (IQ), emotional intelligence (EI), and emotional awareness (EA). We found that maintaining emotional feelings, even when accounting for neural activation attributable to maintaining emotional images/words, still activated a left lateral frontal-parietal network (including the anterior insula and posterior dorsomedial frontal cortex). We also found that individual differences in the ability to maintain feelings were positively associated with IQ and EA, but not with EI. These results suggest that maintaining the feelings of others (at least when perceived exteroceptively) involves similar frontal-parietal control networks to exteroceptive WM, and that it is similarly linked to IQ, but that it also may be an important component of EA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbernsx011
Pages (from-to)848-860
Number of pages13
JournalSocial Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

Fingerprint

Short-Term Memory
Emotions
Emotional Intelligence
Aptitude
Frontal Lobe
Intelligence
Individuality
Neuroimaging
Healthy Volunteers

Keywords

  • Emotion
  • Emotional working memory
  • Insula
  • Prefrontal cortex
  • Social cognition
  • Working memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Maintaining the feelings of others in working memory is associated with activation of the left anterior insula and left frontal-parietal control network. / Smith, Ryan; Lane, Richard D; Alkozei, Anna; Bao, Jennifer; Smith, Courtney; Sanova, Anna; Nettles, Matthew; Killgore, William.

In: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, Vol. 12, No. 5, nsx011, 01.05.2017, p. 848-860.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{faff5c9281fe457887326f603c9a216a,
title = "Maintaining the feelings of others in working memory is associated with activation of the left anterior insula and left frontal-parietal control network",
abstract = "The maintenance of social/emotional information in working memory (SWM/EWM) has recently been the topic of multiple neuroimaging studies. However, some studies find that SWM/EWM involves a medial frontal-parietal network while others instead find lateral frontal-parietal activations similar to studies of verbal and visuospatial WM. In this study, we asked 26 healthy volunteers to complete an EWM task designed to examine whether different cognitive strategies- maintaining emotional images, words, or feelings- might account for these discrepant results. We also examined whether differences in EWM performance were related to general intelligence (IQ), emotional intelligence (EI), and emotional awareness (EA). We found that maintaining emotional feelings, even when accounting for neural activation attributable to maintaining emotional images/words, still activated a left lateral frontal-parietal network (including the anterior insula and posterior dorsomedial frontal cortex). We also found that individual differences in the ability to maintain feelings were positively associated with IQ and EA, but not with EI. These results suggest that maintaining the feelings of others (at least when perceived exteroceptively) involves similar frontal-parietal control networks to exteroceptive WM, and that it is similarly linked to IQ, but that it also may be an important component of EA.",
keywords = "Emotion, Emotional working memory, Insula, Prefrontal cortex, Social cognition, Working memory",
author = "Ryan Smith and Lane, {Richard D} and Anna Alkozei and Jennifer Bao and Courtney Smith and Anna Sanova and Matthew Nettles and William Killgore",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/scan/nsx011",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "848--860",
journal = "Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience",
issn = "1749-5024",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Maintaining the feelings of others in working memory is associated with activation of the left anterior insula and left frontal-parietal control network

AU - Smith, Ryan

AU - Lane, Richard D

AU - Alkozei, Anna

AU - Bao, Jennifer

AU - Smith, Courtney

AU - Sanova, Anna

AU - Nettles, Matthew

AU - Killgore, William

PY - 2017/5/1

Y1 - 2017/5/1

N2 - The maintenance of social/emotional information in working memory (SWM/EWM) has recently been the topic of multiple neuroimaging studies. However, some studies find that SWM/EWM involves a medial frontal-parietal network while others instead find lateral frontal-parietal activations similar to studies of verbal and visuospatial WM. In this study, we asked 26 healthy volunteers to complete an EWM task designed to examine whether different cognitive strategies- maintaining emotional images, words, or feelings- might account for these discrepant results. We also examined whether differences in EWM performance were related to general intelligence (IQ), emotional intelligence (EI), and emotional awareness (EA). We found that maintaining emotional feelings, even when accounting for neural activation attributable to maintaining emotional images/words, still activated a left lateral frontal-parietal network (including the anterior insula and posterior dorsomedial frontal cortex). We also found that individual differences in the ability to maintain feelings were positively associated with IQ and EA, but not with EI. These results suggest that maintaining the feelings of others (at least when perceived exteroceptively) involves similar frontal-parietal control networks to exteroceptive WM, and that it is similarly linked to IQ, but that it also may be an important component of EA.

AB - The maintenance of social/emotional information in working memory (SWM/EWM) has recently been the topic of multiple neuroimaging studies. However, some studies find that SWM/EWM involves a medial frontal-parietal network while others instead find lateral frontal-parietal activations similar to studies of verbal and visuospatial WM. In this study, we asked 26 healthy volunteers to complete an EWM task designed to examine whether different cognitive strategies- maintaining emotional images, words, or feelings- might account for these discrepant results. We also examined whether differences in EWM performance were related to general intelligence (IQ), emotional intelligence (EI), and emotional awareness (EA). We found that maintaining emotional feelings, even when accounting for neural activation attributable to maintaining emotional images/words, still activated a left lateral frontal-parietal network (including the anterior insula and posterior dorsomedial frontal cortex). We also found that individual differences in the ability to maintain feelings were positively associated with IQ and EA, but not with EI. These results suggest that maintaining the feelings of others (at least when perceived exteroceptively) involves similar frontal-parietal control networks to exteroceptive WM, and that it is similarly linked to IQ, but that it also may be an important component of EA.

KW - Emotion

KW - Emotional working memory

KW - Insula

KW - Prefrontal cortex

KW - Social cognition

KW - Working memory

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85021322670&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85021322670&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/scan/nsx011

DO - 10.1093/scan/nsx011

M3 - Article

C2 - 28158779

AN - SCOPUS:85021322670

VL - 12

SP - 848

EP - 860

JO - Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

JF - Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

SN - 1749-5024

IS - 5

M1 - nsx011

ER -