Managing and distributing residue for conservation tillage in the Pacific Northwest

Mark C Siemens, Dale E. Wilkins, Stewart B. Wuest

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In the agricultural regions of the Pacific Northwest, adoption of reduced tillage systems lags that of the United States as a whole. The limited adoption of this practice in the Pacific Northwest is due not only to economic and agronomic concerns, but also to the lack of trouble free, reliable seeding equipment for planting into the heavy residue encountered in this region. A project was initiated to develop a residue management strategy that would improve hoe-type no-till drill performance. Three types of combines, various seedbed preparation methods and different seeder attachments were investigated on a plot that yielded 85 bu/ac of winter wheat and had approximately 9,000 lbs/ac of residue. Acceptable no-till drill performance in terms of stand count, plant growth and yield potential was obtained when standing stubble was less than 8 in. tall and the residue was uniformly distributed. Uniformly distributing residue was the most important factor for maximizing direct seed drill performance in heavy residue. Drill attachments such as a coulter and a patent pending residue management wheel yielded mixed and improved results respectively. As expected, when nearly all residue was removed drill performance was excellent. Chopping the residue into fine, 1.25 in. long pieces provided stand counts and seedling yield potential parameters equivalent to those of removing the residue completely. It is not known whether cost of the energy required for this operation is economically viable, but does provide some hope for an improved residue management strategy over what is currently available.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2000 ASAE Annual Intenational Meeting, Technical Papers: Engineering Solutions for a New Century
Pages1559-1572
Number of pages14
Volume1
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes
Event2000 ASAE Annual International Meeting, Technical Papers: Engineering Solutions for a New Century - Milwaukee, WI, United States
Duration: Jul 9 2000Jul 12 2000

Other

Other2000 ASAE Annual International Meeting, Technical Papers: Engineering Solutions for a New Century
CountryUnited States
CityMilwaukee, WI
Period7/9/007/12/00

Fingerprint

Conservation
Seed
Wheels
Economics
Costs

Keywords

  • Direct seed
  • Drill performance
  • No-till drill
  • Residue distribution
  • Residue management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Siemens, M. C., Wilkins, D. E., & Wuest, S. B. (2000). Managing and distributing residue for conservation tillage in the Pacific Northwest. In 2000 ASAE Annual Intenational Meeting, Technical Papers: Engineering Solutions for a New Century (Vol. 1, pp. 1559-1572)

Managing and distributing residue for conservation tillage in the Pacific Northwest. / Siemens, Mark C; Wilkins, Dale E.; Wuest, Stewart B.

2000 ASAE Annual Intenational Meeting, Technical Papers: Engineering Solutions for a New Century. Vol. 1 2000. p. 1559-1572.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Siemens, MC, Wilkins, DE & Wuest, SB 2000, Managing and distributing residue for conservation tillage in the Pacific Northwest. in 2000 ASAE Annual Intenational Meeting, Technical Papers: Engineering Solutions for a New Century. vol. 1, pp. 1559-1572, 2000 ASAE Annual International Meeting, Technical Papers: Engineering Solutions for a New Century, Milwaukee, WI, United States, 7/9/00.
Siemens MC, Wilkins DE, Wuest SB. Managing and distributing residue for conservation tillage in the Pacific Northwest. In 2000 ASAE Annual Intenational Meeting, Technical Papers: Engineering Solutions for a New Century. Vol. 1. 2000. p. 1559-1572
Siemens, Mark C ; Wilkins, Dale E. ; Wuest, Stewart B. / Managing and distributing residue for conservation tillage in the Pacific Northwest. 2000 ASAE Annual Intenational Meeting, Technical Papers: Engineering Solutions for a New Century. Vol. 1 2000. pp. 1559-1572
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