Manual versus mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in an experimental canine model

Karl B Kern, A. B. Carter, R. L. Showen, W. D. Voorhees, C. F. Babbs, W. A. Tacker, G. A. Ewy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Manual and mechanical chest compressions during CPR were compared in the canine model. Endpoints were hemodynamics produced during CPR, resuscitation success at 30 min, 24-h survival, neurologic function of survivors, and CPR-produced trauma. Ten animals in each group underwent 20 min of ventricular fibrillation, during which CPR was performed for 17 min. Hemodynamics produced with manual and mechanical chest compressions were similar. Seven of ten animals in each group were resuscitated. Five animals from the manual group and four animals from the mechanical group survived for 24 h. Neurologic function of survivors was excellent and similar in each group. There was no significant difference in trauma between the two types of chest compression. The similar results for manual and mechanical chest compression in this canine model suggest that different experimental CPR studies can be compared regardless or whether manual or mechanical chest compressions were performed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)899-903
Number of pages5
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume13
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1985

Fingerprint

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Canidae
Theoretical Models
Thorax
Nervous System
Hemodynamics
Wounds and Injuries
Ventricular Fibrillation
Resuscitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Kern, K. B., Carter, A. B., Showen, R. L., Voorhees, W. D., Babbs, C. F., Tacker, W. A., & Ewy, G. A. (1985). Manual versus mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in an experimental canine model. Critical Care Medicine, 13(11), 899-903.

Manual versus mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in an experimental canine model. / Kern, Karl B; Carter, A. B.; Showen, R. L.; Voorhees, W. D.; Babbs, C. F.; Tacker, W. A.; Ewy, G. A.

In: Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 11, 1985, p. 899-903.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kern, KB, Carter, AB, Showen, RL, Voorhees, WD, Babbs, CF, Tacker, WA & Ewy, GA 1985, 'Manual versus mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in an experimental canine model', Critical Care Medicine, vol. 13, no. 11, pp. 899-903.
Kern KB, Carter AB, Showen RL, Voorhees WD, Babbs CF, Tacker WA et al. Manual versus mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in an experimental canine model. Critical Care Medicine. 1985;13(11):899-903.
Kern, Karl B ; Carter, A. B. ; Showen, R. L. ; Voorhees, W. D. ; Babbs, C. F. ; Tacker, W. A. ; Ewy, G. A. / Manual versus mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in an experimental canine model. In: Critical Care Medicine. 1985 ; Vol. 13, No. 11. pp. 899-903.
@article{d85ff0433e7c46239080238436525779,
title = "Manual versus mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in an experimental canine model",
abstract = "Manual and mechanical chest compressions during CPR were compared in the canine model. Endpoints were hemodynamics produced during CPR, resuscitation success at 30 min, 24-h survival, neurologic function of survivors, and CPR-produced trauma. Ten animals in each group underwent 20 min of ventricular fibrillation, during which CPR was performed for 17 min. Hemodynamics produced with manual and mechanical chest compressions were similar. Seven of ten animals in each group were resuscitated. Five animals from the manual group and four animals from the mechanical group survived for 24 h. Neurologic function of survivors was excellent and similar in each group. There was no significant difference in trauma between the two types of chest compression. The similar results for manual and mechanical chest compression in this canine model suggest that different experimental CPR studies can be compared regardless or whether manual or mechanical chest compressions were performed.",
author = "Kern, {Karl B} and Carter, {A. B.} and Showen, {R. L.} and Voorhees, {W. D.} and Babbs, {C. F.} and Tacker, {W. A.} and Ewy, {G. A.}",
year = "1985",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
pages = "899--903",
journal = "Critical Care Medicine",
issn = "0090-3493",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Manual versus mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in an experimental canine model

AU - Kern, Karl B

AU - Carter, A. B.

AU - Showen, R. L.

AU - Voorhees, W. D.

AU - Babbs, C. F.

AU - Tacker, W. A.

AU - Ewy, G. A.

PY - 1985

Y1 - 1985

N2 - Manual and mechanical chest compressions during CPR were compared in the canine model. Endpoints were hemodynamics produced during CPR, resuscitation success at 30 min, 24-h survival, neurologic function of survivors, and CPR-produced trauma. Ten animals in each group underwent 20 min of ventricular fibrillation, during which CPR was performed for 17 min. Hemodynamics produced with manual and mechanical chest compressions were similar. Seven of ten animals in each group were resuscitated. Five animals from the manual group and four animals from the mechanical group survived for 24 h. Neurologic function of survivors was excellent and similar in each group. There was no significant difference in trauma between the two types of chest compression. The similar results for manual and mechanical chest compression in this canine model suggest that different experimental CPR studies can be compared regardless or whether manual or mechanical chest compressions were performed.

AB - Manual and mechanical chest compressions during CPR were compared in the canine model. Endpoints were hemodynamics produced during CPR, resuscitation success at 30 min, 24-h survival, neurologic function of survivors, and CPR-produced trauma. Ten animals in each group underwent 20 min of ventricular fibrillation, during which CPR was performed for 17 min. Hemodynamics produced with manual and mechanical chest compressions were similar. Seven of ten animals in each group were resuscitated. Five animals from the manual group and four animals from the mechanical group survived for 24 h. Neurologic function of survivors was excellent and similar in each group. There was no significant difference in trauma between the two types of chest compression. The similar results for manual and mechanical chest compression in this canine model suggest that different experimental CPR studies can be compared regardless or whether manual or mechanical chest compressions were performed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0022372477&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0022372477&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 4053636

AN - SCOPUS:0022372477

VL - 13

SP - 899

EP - 903

JO - Critical Care Medicine

JF - Critical Care Medicine

SN - 0090-3493

IS - 11

ER -