Mapping cardiac currents using ultrasound current source density imaging

R. Olafsson, Russell S Witte, S. W. Huang, M. O. Donnell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We describe the first mapping of biological current in a live heart using Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging (UCSDI). Ablation procedures that treat severe heart arrhythmias require detailed maps of the cardiac activation wave. UCSDI can potentially improve on existing mapping procedures which are time-consuming and limited by its poor spatial resolution (5-10 mm). UCSDI is based on a pressure-induced change in resistivity known as the acousto-electric (AE) effect, which is spatially confined to the ultrasound focus. Data from two experiments are presented. A 540 kHz ultrasonic transducer (f/#=l, focal length=90 mm, pulse repetition frequency=1600Hz) was scanned over an isolated rabbit heart, perfused with excitation-contraction decoupler to significantly reduce motion while retaining electric function. Tungsten electrodes inserted in the left ventricles recorded simultaneously the AE signal and the low frequency electrocardiogram (ECG). UCSDI displayed spatial and temporal patterns consistent with the spreading activation wave. The propagation velocity estimated from UCSDI was 0.25±0.05 mm/ms, comparable to the values obtained with the ECG signals. The maximum AE signal-to-noise ratio after filtering was 18dB, with an equivalent detection threshold of 0.1 mA/cm 2. This study demonstrates that UCSDI is a potentially powerful technique for mapping current flow and biopotentials in the heart.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium
Pages757-760
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Event2008 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, IUS 2008 - Beijing, China
Duration: Nov 2 2008Nov 5 2008

Other

Other2008 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, IUS 2008
CountryChina
CityBeijing
Period11/2/0811/5/08

Fingerprint

electrocardiography
activation
arrhythmia
propagation velocity
rabbits
retaining
ablation
contraction
repetition
transducers
tungsten
signal to noise ratios
ultrasonics
spatial resolution
low frequencies
electrical resistivity
thresholds
electrodes
pulses
excitation

Keywords

  • Acousto-electric
  • Arrhythmia
  • Cardiac mapping
  • Electrocardiology
  • Electromechanical imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Olafsson, R., Witte, R. S., Huang, S. W., & Donnell, M. O. (2008). Mapping cardiac currents using ultrasound current source density imaging. In Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium (pp. 757-760). [4803648] https://doi.org/10.1109IULTSYM.2008.0181

Mapping cardiac currents using ultrasound current source density imaging. / Olafsson, R.; Witte, Russell S; Huang, S. W.; Donnell, M. O.

Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium. 2008. p. 757-760 4803648.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Olafsson, R, Witte, RS, Huang, SW & Donnell, MO 2008, Mapping cardiac currents using ultrasound current source density imaging. in Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium., 4803648, pp. 757-760, 2008 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, IUS 2008, Beijing, China, 11/2/08. https://doi.org/10.1109IULTSYM.2008.0181
Olafsson R, Witte RS, Huang SW, Donnell MO. Mapping cardiac currents using ultrasound current source density imaging. In Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium. 2008. p. 757-760. 4803648 https://doi.org/10.1109IULTSYM.2008.0181
Olafsson, R. ; Witte, Russell S ; Huang, S. W. ; Donnell, M. O. / Mapping cardiac currents using ultrasound current source density imaging. Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium. 2008. pp. 757-760
@inproceedings{8669154eab6143a28705fb88b4e1d826,
title = "Mapping cardiac currents using ultrasound current source density imaging",
abstract = "We describe the first mapping of biological current in a live heart using Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging (UCSDI). Ablation procedures that treat severe heart arrhythmias require detailed maps of the cardiac activation wave. UCSDI can potentially improve on existing mapping procedures which are time-consuming and limited by its poor spatial resolution (5-10 mm). UCSDI is based on a pressure-induced change in resistivity known as the acousto-electric (AE) effect, which is spatially confined to the ultrasound focus. Data from two experiments are presented. A 540 kHz ultrasonic transducer (f/#=l, focal length=90 mm, pulse repetition frequency=1600Hz) was scanned over an isolated rabbit heart, perfused with excitation-contraction decoupler to significantly reduce motion while retaining electric function. Tungsten electrodes inserted in the left ventricles recorded simultaneously the AE signal and the low frequency electrocardiogram (ECG). UCSDI displayed spatial and temporal patterns consistent with the spreading activation wave. The propagation velocity estimated from UCSDI was 0.25±0.05 mm/ms, comparable to the values obtained with the ECG signals. The maximum AE signal-to-noise ratio after filtering was 18dB, with an equivalent detection threshold of 0.1 mA/cm 2. This study demonstrates that UCSDI is a potentially powerful technique for mapping current flow and biopotentials in the heart.",
keywords = "Acousto-electric, Arrhythmia, Cardiac mapping, Electrocardiology, Electromechanical imaging",
author = "R. Olafsson and Witte, {Russell S} and Huang, {S. W.} and Donnell, {M. O.}",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1109IULTSYM.2008.0181",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "757--760",
booktitle = "Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Mapping cardiac currents using ultrasound current source density imaging

AU - Olafsson, R.

AU - Witte, Russell S

AU - Huang, S. W.

AU - Donnell, M. O.

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - We describe the first mapping of biological current in a live heart using Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging (UCSDI). Ablation procedures that treat severe heart arrhythmias require detailed maps of the cardiac activation wave. UCSDI can potentially improve on existing mapping procedures which are time-consuming and limited by its poor spatial resolution (5-10 mm). UCSDI is based on a pressure-induced change in resistivity known as the acousto-electric (AE) effect, which is spatially confined to the ultrasound focus. Data from two experiments are presented. A 540 kHz ultrasonic transducer (f/#=l, focal length=90 mm, pulse repetition frequency=1600Hz) was scanned over an isolated rabbit heart, perfused with excitation-contraction decoupler to significantly reduce motion while retaining electric function. Tungsten electrodes inserted in the left ventricles recorded simultaneously the AE signal and the low frequency electrocardiogram (ECG). UCSDI displayed spatial and temporal patterns consistent with the spreading activation wave. The propagation velocity estimated from UCSDI was 0.25±0.05 mm/ms, comparable to the values obtained with the ECG signals. The maximum AE signal-to-noise ratio after filtering was 18dB, with an equivalent detection threshold of 0.1 mA/cm 2. This study demonstrates that UCSDI is a potentially powerful technique for mapping current flow and biopotentials in the heart.

AB - We describe the first mapping of biological current in a live heart using Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging (UCSDI). Ablation procedures that treat severe heart arrhythmias require detailed maps of the cardiac activation wave. UCSDI can potentially improve on existing mapping procedures which are time-consuming and limited by its poor spatial resolution (5-10 mm). UCSDI is based on a pressure-induced change in resistivity known as the acousto-electric (AE) effect, which is spatially confined to the ultrasound focus. Data from two experiments are presented. A 540 kHz ultrasonic transducer (f/#=l, focal length=90 mm, pulse repetition frequency=1600Hz) was scanned over an isolated rabbit heart, perfused with excitation-contraction decoupler to significantly reduce motion while retaining electric function. Tungsten electrodes inserted in the left ventricles recorded simultaneously the AE signal and the low frequency electrocardiogram (ECG). UCSDI displayed spatial and temporal patterns consistent with the spreading activation wave. The propagation velocity estimated from UCSDI was 0.25±0.05 mm/ms, comparable to the values obtained with the ECG signals. The maximum AE signal-to-noise ratio after filtering was 18dB, with an equivalent detection threshold of 0.1 mA/cm 2. This study demonstrates that UCSDI is a potentially powerful technique for mapping current flow and biopotentials in the heart.

KW - Acousto-electric

KW - Arrhythmia

KW - Cardiac mapping

KW - Electrocardiology

KW - Electromechanical imaging

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=67649342929&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=67649342929&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109IULTSYM.2008.0181

DO - 10.1109IULTSYM.2008.0181

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:67649342929

SP - 757

EP - 760

BT - Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium

ER -