Mapping impervious surfaces using object-oriented classification in a semiarid urban region

Zachary P. Sugg, Tobias Finke, David C. Goodrich, M. Susan Moran, Stephen Yool

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mapping the expansion of impervious surfaces in urbanizing areas is important for monitoring and understanding the hydrologic impacts of land development. The most common approach using spectral vegetation indices, however, is difficult in arid and semiarid environments where vegetation is sparse and often senescent. In this study object-oriented classification of high-resolution imagery was used to develop a cost-effective, semi-automated approach for mapping impervious surfaces in Sierra Vista, Arizona for an individual neighborhood and the larger sub-watershed. Results from the neighborhood-scale analysis show that object-oriented classification of QuickBird imagery produced repeatable results with good accuracy. Applying the approach to a 1,179 km2 region produced maps of impervious surfaces with a mean overall accuracy of 88.1 percent. This study demonstrates the value of employing object-oriented classification of high-resolution imagery to operationally monitor urban growth in arid lands at different spatial scales in order to fill knowledge gaps critical to effective watershed management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-352
Number of pages10
JournalPhotogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing
Volume80
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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urban region
semiarid region
imagery
Watersheds
Urban growth
QuickBird
urban growth
vegetation index
watershed
Monitoring
vegetation
monitoring
cost
Costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computers in Earth Sciences

Cite this

Mapping impervious surfaces using object-oriented classification in a semiarid urban region. / Sugg, Zachary P.; Finke, Tobias; Goodrich, David C.; Susan Moran, M.; Yool, Stephen.

In: Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing, Vol. 80, No. 4, 2014, p. 343-352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sugg, Zachary P. ; Finke, Tobias ; Goodrich, David C. ; Susan Moran, M. ; Yool, Stephen. / Mapping impervious surfaces using object-oriented classification in a semiarid urban region. In: Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing. 2014 ; Vol. 80, No. 4. pp. 343-352.
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