Marine DNA Viral Macro- and Microdiversity from Pole to Pole

Tara Oceans Coordinators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microbes drive most ecosystems and are modulated by viruses that impact their lifespan, gene flow, and metabolic outputs. However, ecosystem-level impacts of viral community diversity remain difficult to assess due to classification issues and few reference genomes. Here, we establish an ∼12-fold expanded global ocean DNA virome dataset of 195,728 viral populations, now including the Arctic Ocean, and validate that these populations form discrete genotypic clusters. Meta-community analyses revealed five ecological zones throughout the global ocean, including two distinct Arctic regions. Across the zones, local and global patterns and drivers in viral community diversity were established for both macrodiversity (inter-population diversity) and microdiversity (intra-population genetic variation). These patterns sometimes, but not always, paralleled those from macro-organisms and revealed temperate and tropical surface waters and the Arctic as biodiversity hotspots and mechanistic hypotheses to explain them. Such further understanding of ocean viruses is critical for broader inclusion in ecosystem models. A global survey of ocean virus genomes vastly expands our understanding of this understudied community and reveals the Arctic as unexpected hotspot for viral biodiversity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1109-1123.e14
JournalCell
Volume177
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 16 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Viral DNA
Viruses
Oceans and Seas
Ecosystems
Macros
Poles
Genes
Biodiversity
Ecosystem
Surface waters
Arctic Regions
Genome
Population
Gene Flow
Population Genetics
DNA
Meta-Analysis
Water

Keywords

  • community ecology
  • diversity gradients
  • marine biology
  • metagenomics
  • population ecology
  • species
  • viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Marine DNA Viral Macro- and Microdiversity from Pole to Pole. / Tara Oceans Coordinators.

In: Cell, Vol. 177, No. 5, 16.05.2019, p. 1109-1123.e14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tara Oceans Coordinators 2019, 'Marine DNA Viral Macro- and Microdiversity from Pole to Pole', Cell, vol. 177, no. 5, pp. 1109-1123.e14. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2019.03.040
Tara Oceans Coordinators. / Marine DNA Viral Macro- and Microdiversity from Pole to Pole. In: Cell. 2019 ; Vol. 177, No. 5. pp. 1109-1123.e14.
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