Markers that discriminate between European and African ancestry show limited variation within Africa

Heather E. Collin-Schramm, Rick A. Kittles, Darwin J. Operario, James L. Weber, Lindsey A. Criswell, Richard S. Cooper, Michael F. Seldin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

Markers informative for ancestry are necessary for admixture mapping and improving case-control association analyses. In particular, African Americans are an admixed population for which genetic studies require accurately evaluating admixture. This will require markers that can be used in African Americans to determine if a given genomic region is European or African ancestry. This report shows that, despite studies indicating high intra-African sequence variation, markers with large inter-ethnic differences have only small variations in allele distribution among divergent African populations and should be valuable for evaluating admixture in complex disease genetic studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)566-569
Number of pages4
JournalHuman Genetics
Volume111
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Markers that discriminate between European and African ancestry show limited variation within Africa'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Collin-Schramm, H. E., Kittles, R. A., Operario, D. J., Weber, J. L., Criswell, L. A., Cooper, R. S., & Seldin, M. F. (2002). Markers that discriminate between European and African ancestry show limited variation within Africa. Human Genetics, 111(6), 566-569. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00439-002-0818-z