Mars water-ice clouds and precipitation

J. A. Whiteway, L. Komguem, C. Dickinson, C. Cook, M. Illnicki, J. Seabrook, V. Popovici, T. J. Duck, R. Davy, P. A. Taylor, J. Pathak, D. Fisher, A. I. Carswell, M. Daly, V. Hipkin, A. P. Zent, M. H. Hecht, S. E. Wood, L. K. Tamppari, N. RennoJ. E. Moores, M. T. Lemmon, F. Daerden, Peter Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

124 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The light detection and ranging instrument on the Phoenix mission observed water-ice clouds in the atmosphere of Mars that were similar to cirrus clouds on Earth. Fall streaks in the cloud structure traced the precipitation of ice crystals toward the ground. Measurements of atmospheric dust indicated that the planetary boundary layer (PBL) on Mars was well mixed, up to heights of around 4 kilometers, by the summer daytime turbulence and convection. The water-ice clouds were detected at the top of the PBL and near the ground each night in late summer after the air temperature started decreasing. The interpretation is that water vapor mixed upward by daytime turbulence and convection forms ice crystal clouds at night that precipitate back toward the surface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)68-70
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume325
Issue number5936
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2009

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Mars
Ice
Convection
Water
Steam
Dust
Atmosphere
Air
Light
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Whiteway, J. A., Komguem, L., Dickinson, C., Cook, C., Illnicki, M., Seabrook, J., ... Smith, P. (2009). Mars water-ice clouds and precipitation. Science, 325(5936), 68-70. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1172344

Mars water-ice clouds and precipitation. / Whiteway, J. A.; Komguem, L.; Dickinson, C.; Cook, C.; Illnicki, M.; Seabrook, J.; Popovici, V.; Duck, T. J.; Davy, R.; Taylor, P. A.; Pathak, J.; Fisher, D.; Carswell, A. I.; Daly, M.; Hipkin, V.; Zent, A. P.; Hecht, M. H.; Wood, S. E.; Tamppari, L. K.; Renno, N.; Moores, J. E.; Lemmon, M. T.; Daerden, F.; Smith, Peter.

In: Science, Vol. 325, No. 5936, 03.07.2009, p. 68-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Whiteway, JA, Komguem, L, Dickinson, C, Cook, C, Illnicki, M, Seabrook, J, Popovici, V, Duck, TJ, Davy, R, Taylor, PA, Pathak, J, Fisher, D, Carswell, AI, Daly, M, Hipkin, V, Zent, AP, Hecht, MH, Wood, SE, Tamppari, LK, Renno, N, Moores, JE, Lemmon, MT, Daerden, F & Smith, P 2009, 'Mars water-ice clouds and precipitation', Science, vol. 325, no. 5936, pp. 68-70. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1172344
Whiteway JA, Komguem L, Dickinson C, Cook C, Illnicki M, Seabrook J et al. Mars water-ice clouds and precipitation. Science. 2009 Jul 3;325(5936):68-70. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1172344
Whiteway, J. A. ; Komguem, L. ; Dickinson, C. ; Cook, C. ; Illnicki, M. ; Seabrook, J. ; Popovici, V. ; Duck, T. J. ; Davy, R. ; Taylor, P. A. ; Pathak, J. ; Fisher, D. ; Carswell, A. I. ; Daly, M. ; Hipkin, V. ; Zent, A. P. ; Hecht, M. H. ; Wood, S. E. ; Tamppari, L. K. ; Renno, N. ; Moores, J. E. ; Lemmon, M. T. ; Daerden, F. ; Smith, Peter. / Mars water-ice clouds and precipitation. In: Science. 2009 ; Vol. 325, No. 5936. pp. 68-70.
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AU - Popovici, V.

AU - Duck, T. J.

AU - Davy, R.

AU - Taylor, P. A.

AU - Pathak, J.

AU - Fisher, D.

AU - Carswell, A. I.

AU - Daly, M.

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AU - Hecht, M. H.

AU - Wood, S. E.

AU - Tamppari, L. K.

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