Measurement of diamond conditioner microwear

L. Borucki, Y. Sampurno, Y. Zhuang, Ara Philipossian, T. Merchant, J. Zabasajja

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Diamond wear is measured on a conditioning tool by numerical matching of interferometry images taken in overlapping areas before and after extended wear testing. The matching algorithm finds the largest common region shared by the two images and reorients the final image in space to produce the best possible match with the initial image in the binding metallization. By characterizing the images using surface height probability density functions, peaks in the height distributions can be identified that correspond to single diamonds or groups of diamonds. Shifts in the peaks after wear testing then provide an estimate of the mean wear rate. The average diamond wear rate on polyurethane was found to be about 5×10-4 μm/min at 2 PSI nominal pressure, with higher diamonds wearing faster than shorter ones and diamonds on the outside edge of the conditioning tool wearing slightly faster than those in the center. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of microwear. Microwear was observed to coincide with a gradual decline in pad cut rate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2005 Proceedings - 22nd International VLSI Multilevel Interconnection Conference, VMIC 2005
Pages441-445
Number of pages5
StatePublished - 2005
Event22nd International VLSI Multilevel Interconnection Conference, VMIC 2005 - Fremont, CA, United States
Duration: Oct 4 2005Oct 6 2005

Other

Other22nd International VLSI Multilevel Interconnection Conference, VMIC 2005
CountryUnited States
CityFremont, CA
Period10/4/0510/6/05

Fingerprint

Diamonds
Wear of materials
Testing
Metallizing
Interferometry
Probability density function
Electron microscopy
Polyurethanes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Borucki, L., Sampurno, Y., Zhuang, Y., Philipossian, A., Merchant, T., & Zabasajja, J. (2005). Measurement of diamond conditioner microwear. In 2005 Proceedings - 22nd International VLSI Multilevel Interconnection Conference, VMIC 2005 (pp. 441-445)

Measurement of diamond conditioner microwear. / Borucki, L.; Sampurno, Y.; Zhuang, Y.; Philipossian, Ara; Merchant, T.; Zabasajja, J.

2005 Proceedings - 22nd International VLSI Multilevel Interconnection Conference, VMIC 2005. 2005. p. 441-445.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Borucki, L, Sampurno, Y, Zhuang, Y, Philipossian, A, Merchant, T & Zabasajja, J 2005, Measurement of diamond conditioner microwear. in 2005 Proceedings - 22nd International VLSI Multilevel Interconnection Conference, VMIC 2005. pp. 441-445, 22nd International VLSI Multilevel Interconnection Conference, VMIC 2005, Fremont, CA, United States, 10/4/05.
Borucki L, Sampurno Y, Zhuang Y, Philipossian A, Merchant T, Zabasajja J. Measurement of diamond conditioner microwear. In 2005 Proceedings - 22nd International VLSI Multilevel Interconnection Conference, VMIC 2005. 2005. p. 441-445
Borucki, L. ; Sampurno, Y. ; Zhuang, Y. ; Philipossian, Ara ; Merchant, T. ; Zabasajja, J. / Measurement of diamond conditioner microwear. 2005 Proceedings - 22nd International VLSI Multilevel Interconnection Conference, VMIC 2005. 2005. pp. 441-445
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