Measures of Body Size Based on Height, Weight, and Reported Ideal Weight: Conceptual Distinctions and Empirical Demonstrations

Mary A. Nies, Tom H. Cook, Joseph Hepworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using height, weight, and self-reported weight, eight additional measures of body size werecomputed. The purpose of this paper was to specify conceptual distinctions and test hypothesized relationships among those newly constructed measures. Using a sample of healthy African American and European American women, correlations among the measures and race differences were assessed. High correlations suggested only two independent constructs, but theoretical considerations would suggest retaining, in addition to the traditional measure of body mass index, three new constructs: ideal body mass, a discrepancy measure, and a desirability measure. The only significant race difference was on ideal body mass. African American women reported a larger ideal body mass index than European American women. The use of actual versus self-report measures of height and weight, different conceptualizations of ideal weight, and clinical implications also were discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-33
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Nursing Measurement
Volume7
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Body Size
Ideal Body Weight
Weights and Measures
African Americans
Body Mass Index
Self Report

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Measures of Body Size Based on Height, Weight, and Reported Ideal Weight : Conceptual Distinctions and Empirical Demonstrations. / Nies, Mary A.; Cook, Tom H.; Hepworth, Joseph.

In: Journal of Nursing Measurement, Vol. 7, No. 1, 03.1999, p. 21-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{8ef167e9330043daa02328fe7e4d28d9,
title = "Measures of Body Size Based on Height, Weight, and Reported Ideal Weight: Conceptual Distinctions and Empirical Demonstrations",
abstract = "Using height, weight, and self-reported weight, eight additional measures of body size werecomputed. The purpose of this paper was to specify conceptual distinctions and test hypothesized relationships among those newly constructed measures. Using a sample of healthy African American and European American women, correlations among the measures and race differences were assessed. High correlations suggested only two independent constructs, but theoretical considerations would suggest retaining, in addition to the traditional measure of body mass index, three new constructs: ideal body mass, a discrepancy measure, and a desirability measure. The only significant race difference was on ideal body mass. African American women reported a larger ideal body mass index than European American women. The use of actual versus self-report measures of height and weight, different conceptualizations of ideal weight, and clinical implications also were discussed.",
author = "Nies, {Mary A.} and Cook, {Tom H.} and Joseph Hepworth",
year = "1999",
month = "3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "21--33",
journal = "Journal of Nursing Measurement",
issn = "1061-3749",
publisher = "Springer Publishing Company",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Measures of Body Size Based on Height, Weight, and Reported Ideal Weight

T2 - Conceptual Distinctions and Empirical Demonstrations

AU - Nies, Mary A.

AU - Cook, Tom H.

AU - Hepworth, Joseph

PY - 1999/3

Y1 - 1999/3

N2 - Using height, weight, and self-reported weight, eight additional measures of body size werecomputed. The purpose of this paper was to specify conceptual distinctions and test hypothesized relationships among those newly constructed measures. Using a sample of healthy African American and European American women, correlations among the measures and race differences were assessed. High correlations suggested only two independent constructs, but theoretical considerations would suggest retaining, in addition to the traditional measure of body mass index, three new constructs: ideal body mass, a discrepancy measure, and a desirability measure. The only significant race difference was on ideal body mass. African American women reported a larger ideal body mass index than European American women. The use of actual versus self-report measures of height and weight, different conceptualizations of ideal weight, and clinical implications also were discussed.

AB - Using height, weight, and self-reported weight, eight additional measures of body size werecomputed. The purpose of this paper was to specify conceptual distinctions and test hypothesized relationships among those newly constructed measures. Using a sample of healthy African American and European American women, correlations among the measures and race differences were assessed. High correlations suggested only two independent constructs, but theoretical considerations would suggest retaining, in addition to the traditional measure of body mass index, three new constructs: ideal body mass, a discrepancy measure, and a desirability measure. The only significant race difference was on ideal body mass. African American women reported a larger ideal body mass index than European American women. The use of actual versus self-report measures of height and weight, different conceptualizations of ideal weight, and clinical implications also were discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033087099&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033087099&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 10394772

AN - SCOPUS:0033087099

VL - 7

SP - 21

EP - 33

JO - Journal of Nursing Measurement

JF - Journal of Nursing Measurement

SN - 1061-3749

IS - 1

ER -