Measures of cognitive function in persons with varying degrees of sleep-disordered breathing: The Sleep Heart Health Study

Lori L. Boland, Eyal Shahar, Conrad Iber, David S. Knopman, Tracy F. Kuo, F. Javier Nieto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Scopus citations

Abstract

Epidemiologic literature suggests that persons with clinically diagnosed sleep apnoea frequently have impaired cognitive function, but whether milder degrees of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) are associated with cognitive dysfunction in the general populaion is largely unknown. Approximately 1700 subjects free of clinically diagnosed SDB underwent at-home polysomnography (PSG) as part of the Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS) and completed three cognitive function tests within 1-2 years of their PSG: the Delayed Word Recall Test (DWR), the WAIS-R Digit Symbol Subtest (DSS), and the Word Fluency test (WF). A respiratory disturbance index (RDI) was calculated as the number of apnoeas and hypopnoeas per hour of sleep. After adjustment for age, education, occupation, field centre, diabetes, hypertension, body-mass index, use of CNS medications, and alcohol drinking status, there was no consistent association between the RDI and any of the three cognitive function measures. There was no evidence of a dose-response relation between the RDI and cognitive function scores and the adjusted mean scores by quartiles of RDI never differed from one another by more than 5% for any of the tests. In this sample of free-living individuals with mostly mild to moderate levels of SDB, the degree of SDB appeared to be unrelated to three measures of cognitive performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-272
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Sleep Research
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 23 2002

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Hypoxaemia
  • Neuropsychology
  • Sleep-disordered breathing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Measures of cognitive function in persons with varying degrees of sleep-disordered breathing: The Sleep Heart Health Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this