Measuring frailty in HIV-infected individuals. Identification of frail patients is the first step to amelioration and reversal of frailty

Hilary C. Rees, Voichita Ianas, Patricia McCracken, Shannon Smith, Anca Georgescu, Tirdad T Zangeneh, Martha J Mohler, Stephen A Klotz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A simple, validated protocol consisting of a battery of tests is available to identify elderly patients with frailty syndrome. This syndrome of decreased reserve and resistance to stressors increases in incidence with increasing age. In the elderly, frailty may pursue a step-wise loss of function from non-frail to pre-frail to frail. We studied frailty in HIV-infected patients and found that ~20% are frail using the Fried phenotype using stringent criteria developed for the elderly. In HIV infection the syndrome occurs at a younger age. HIV patients were checked for 1) unintentional weight loss; 2) slowness as determined by walking speed; 3) weakness as measured by a grip dynamometer; 4) exhaustion by responses to a depression scale; and 5) low physical activity was determined by assessing kilocalories expended in a week's time. Pre-frailty was present with any two of five criteria and frailty was present if any three of the five criteria were abnormal. The tests take approximately 10-15 min to complete and they can be performed by medical assistants during routine clinic visits. Test results are scored by referring to standard tables. Understanding which of the five components contribute to frailty in an individual patient can allow the clinician to address relevant underlying problems, many of which are not evident in routine HIV clinic visits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of visualized experiments : JoVE
Issue number77
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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HIV
Dynamometers
Ambulatory Care
Hand Strength
HIV Infections
Weight Loss
Exercise
Phenotype
Incidence
Walking Speed

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Measuring frailty in HIV-infected individuals. Identification of frail patients is the first step to amelioration and reversal of frailty. / Rees, Hilary C.; Ianas, Voichita; McCracken, Patricia; Smith, Shannon; Georgescu, Anca; Zangeneh, Tirdad T; Mohler, Martha J; Klotz, Stephen A.

In: Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE, No. 77, 01.01.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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