Measuring grain protein concentration with in-line near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

D. S. Long, R. E. Engel, Mark C Siemens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The advent of near infrared (NIR) on-combine sensors gives growers the opportunity to measure the grain protein concentration of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) during harvest. A study consisting of three sequential experiments (laboratory bench, combine test stand, and field) was conducted to evaluate the performance of an in-line, NIR reflectance spectrometer, referred to as the ProSpectra Grain Analyzer, possessing a factory calibration model. In the laboratory bench experiment, the instrument was mounted to a circulating impeller apparatus designed to simulate a moving stream of grain. The ProSpectra performed well on a validation set of 231 grain samples of soft white winter wheat and explained a high level of protein variability (R2 = 0.91, SEP = 3.1 g kg-1) with a slope near unity. In the second experiment, the sensor was installed on a combine test stand constructed from the cross and exit augers, and clean grain elevator of a combine, to create the grain flow conditions found on a combine. Predicted protein was highly correlated (R 2 = 0.93, SEP = 4.5 g kg-1) with reference protein of nine large (14-kg-1) wheat samples. During the third experiment, the instrument was placed on the exit auger of a Case IH 1470 combine for the harvest of a 17-ha winter wheat field. Prospectra protein predictions correlated well with reference protein measurements (R2 = 0.94, SEP = 3.1 g kg-1). This study demonstrated the feasibility of using in-line NIR reflectance spectroscopy to rapidly (0.5 Hz measurement rate) and accurately (SEP < 5.0 g kg-1) measure wheat protein in a moving grain stream.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-252
Number of pages6
JournalAgronomy Journal
Volume100
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008
Externally publishedYes

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grain protein
near-infrared spectroscopy
proteins
sensors (equipment)
winter wheat
grain elevators
soft white wheat
wheat
wheat protein
spectrometers
factories
reflectance
growers
calibration
Triticum aestivum
testing
sampling
prediction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Measuring grain protein concentration with in-line near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. / Long, D. S.; Engel, R. E.; Siemens, Mark C.

In: Agronomy Journal, Vol. 100, No. 2, 04.2008, p. 247-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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