Measuring Localized Surface Infiltration Rates in Secondary Effluent Recharge Basins

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Soil aquifer treatment is the managed infiltration of water, often treated wastewater in recharge basins. Optimal operation of those basins is related to the rate of infiltration and achieving desired water quality improvement. Most often, a mass balance is used to compute the average basin infiltration rate. This averaging method does not provide insight into potential temporal changes in the infiltration rate during the recharge period and spatially varying rates of infiltration across the basin surface. Knowledge of both these factors is critical to engineering optimal basin operation. In order to address this shortcoming, automated infiltrometers have been developed and tested which can measure local infiltration rates (areal scale of ∼0.19 m 2 or ∼2 ft 2) in near real time (time steps of ∼1.0 min). The automated infiltrometers were tested in a recharge basin operated by Tucson Water in Tucson, Arizona and performance data is presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationWorld Water and Environmental Resources Congress
EditorsP. Bizier, P. DeBarry
Pages2303-2310
Number of pages8
StatePublished - 2003
EventWorld Water and Environmental Resources Congress 2003 - Philadelphia, PA, United States
Duration: Jun 23 2003Jun 26 2003

Other

OtherWorld Water and Environmental Resources Congress 2003
CountryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia, PA
Period6/23/036/26/03

Fingerprint

effluents
recharge
infiltration
basins
effluent
basin
infiltrometer
infiltrometers
aquifers
infiltration (hydrology)
wastewater
rate
measuring
infiltration rate
mass balance
engineering
water quality
water
aquifer
soil

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology
  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

Gain, J., Ela, W. P., Arnold, R. G., & Lansey, K. E. (2003). Measuring Localized Surface Infiltration Rates in Secondary Effluent Recharge Basins. In P. Bizier, & P. DeBarry (Eds.), World Water and Environmental Resources Congress (pp. 2303-2310)

Measuring Localized Surface Infiltration Rates in Secondary Effluent Recharge Basins. / Gain, Jennifer; Ela, Wendell P; Arnold, Robert G; Lansey, Kevin E.

World Water and Environmental Resources Congress. ed. / P. Bizier; P. DeBarry. 2003. p. 2303-2310.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Gain, J, Ela, WP, Arnold, RG & Lansey, KE 2003, Measuring Localized Surface Infiltration Rates in Secondary Effluent Recharge Basins. in P Bizier & P DeBarry (eds), World Water and Environmental Resources Congress. pp. 2303-2310, World Water and Environmental Resources Congress 2003, Philadelphia, PA, United States, 6/23/03.
Gain J, Ela WP, Arnold RG, Lansey KE. Measuring Localized Surface Infiltration Rates in Secondary Effluent Recharge Basins. In Bizier P, DeBarry P, editors, World Water and Environmental Resources Congress. 2003. p. 2303-2310
Gain, Jennifer ; Ela, Wendell P ; Arnold, Robert G ; Lansey, Kevin E. / Measuring Localized Surface Infiltration Rates in Secondary Effluent Recharge Basins. World Water and Environmental Resources Congress. editor / P. Bizier ; P. DeBarry. 2003. pp. 2303-2310
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