MECHANICS OF RED BLOOD CELLS IN CAPILLARIES.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A theoretical analysis of red cell motion in capillaries, assuming axisymmetric cell shapes, predicts cell shapes and apparent viscosities which are in good agreement with experimental data. At high cell velocities, the stress in the red cell membrane may be approximated by isotropic tension, and apparent viscosity is nearly independent of velocity. At lower cell velocities, shear and bending stresses become increasingly significant, and apparent viscosity increases with decreasing flow rate. For vessel diameters ranging from 4 mu m to 7 mu m, apparent viscosity at a given hematocrit is not strongly dependent on vessel diameter, despite very marked changes in red cell shape.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication Title
PublisherASME
Pages88-89
Number of pages2
StatePublished - 1986

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Mechanics
Blood
Cells
Viscosity
Cell membranes
Flow rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Secomb, T. W. (1986). MECHANICS OF RED BLOOD CELLS IN CAPILLARIES. In Unknown Host Publication Title (pp. 88-89). ASME.

MECHANICS OF RED BLOOD CELLS IN CAPILLARIES. / Secomb, Timothy W.

Unknown Host Publication Title. ASME, 1986. p. 88-89.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Secomb, TW 1986, MECHANICS OF RED BLOOD CELLS IN CAPILLARIES. in Unknown Host Publication Title. ASME, pp. 88-89.
Secomb TW. MECHANICS OF RED BLOOD CELLS IN CAPILLARIES. In Unknown Host Publication Title. ASME. 1986. p. 88-89
Secomb, Timothy W. / MECHANICS OF RED BLOOD CELLS IN CAPILLARIES. Unknown Host Publication Title. ASME, 1986. pp. 88-89
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