Mechanisms of cell death governed by the balance between nitrosative and oxidative stress

Michael Graham Espey, Katrina M Miranda, Martin Feelisch, Jon Fukuto, Mathew B. Grisham, Michael P. Vitek, David A. Wink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many cellular functions in physiology are regulated by the direct interaction of NO with target biomolecules. In many pathophysiologic and toxicologic mechanisms, NO first reacts with oxygen, superoxide or other nitrogen oxides to subsequently elicit indirect effects. The balance between nitrosative stress and oxidative stress within a specific biological compartment can determine whether the presence of NO will be ultimately deleterious or beneficial. Nitrosative stress can be defined primarily through reactions mediated by N2O3, a reactive nitrogen oxide species generated by high fluxes of NO in an aerobic environment. In contrast, oxidative stress is mediated primarily by superoxide and peroxides. In addition to reactive oxygen species, several reactive nitrogen oxide species such as peroxynitrite, nitroxyl, and nitrogen dioxide can also impose oxidative stress to a cell. We here describe how the mechanisms of cell death are interwoven in the balance between the different chemical intermediates involved in nitrosative and oxidative stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-221
Number of pages13
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume899
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Oxidative stress
Cell death
Oxidative Stress
Cell Death
Reactive Nitrogen Species
Superoxides
Nitric Oxide
Nitrogen Oxides
Nitrogen Dioxide
Peroxynitrous Acid
Peroxides
Physiology
Biomolecules
Reactive Oxygen Species
Oxygen
Fluxes
Cells
Nitrogen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Espey, M. G., Miranda, K. M., Feelisch, M., Fukuto, J., Grisham, M. B., Vitek, M. P., & Wink, D. A. (2000). Mechanisms of cell death governed by the balance between nitrosative and oxidative stress. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 899, 209-221.

Mechanisms of cell death governed by the balance between nitrosative and oxidative stress. / Espey, Michael Graham; Miranda, Katrina M; Feelisch, Martin; Fukuto, Jon; Grisham, Mathew B.; Vitek, Michael P.; Wink, David A.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 899, 2000, p. 209-221.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Espey, MG, Miranda, KM, Feelisch, M, Fukuto, J, Grisham, MB, Vitek, MP & Wink, DA 2000, 'Mechanisms of cell death governed by the balance between nitrosative and oxidative stress', Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 899, pp. 209-221.
Espey, Michael Graham ; Miranda, Katrina M ; Feelisch, Martin ; Fukuto, Jon ; Grisham, Mathew B. ; Vitek, Michael P. ; Wink, David A. / Mechanisms of cell death governed by the balance between nitrosative and oxidative stress. In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2000 ; Vol. 899. pp. 209-221.
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