Mechanisms of metal ion sorption on calcite: Composition mapping by lateral force microscopy

Michael B. Hay, Richard K. Workman, Srinivas Manne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We show that lateral force microscopy (also known as frictional force microscopy) can differentiate between substrate and overlayer phases during an inorganic surface reaction. A calcite substrate is imaged in situ, while immersed in aqueous solutions of pH ∼ 6 9 containing metal ions (Cd2+, Sr2-, and La3+) at concentrations of 10-5 to 10-3 M. Cd2+ and Sr2- passivate surface steps, initiating overgrowth only in solutions already supersaturated relative to their respective carbonates. In contrast, La3+ initiates overgrowth even in undersaturated conditions and carries the reaction to completion by scavenging carbonate anions directly from the dissolving calcite surface. Monomolecular surface steps play a central role, serving as both dissolution sites for the substrate and nucleation sites for the overgrowth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3727-3740
Number of pages14
JournalLangmuir
Volume19
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 29 2003

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Calcium Carbonate
Calcite
calcite
sorption
Metal ions
Sorption
metal ions
Microscopic examination
Carbonates
microscopy
carbonates
dissolving
Substrates
Chemical analysis
Scavenging
scavenging
Surface reactions
surface reactions
Anions
Dissolution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Mechanisms of metal ion sorption on calcite : Composition mapping by lateral force microscopy. / Hay, Michael B.; Workman, Richard K.; Manne, Srinivas.

In: Langmuir, Vol. 19, No. 9, 29.04.2003, p. 3727-3740.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hay, Michael B. ; Workman, Richard K. ; Manne, Srinivas. / Mechanisms of metal ion sorption on calcite : Composition mapping by lateral force microscopy. In: Langmuir. 2003 ; Vol. 19, No. 9. pp. 3727-3740.
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