Media capabilities that support identity communication in virtual teams

David W. Wilson, Sherry M B Thatcher, Susan A Brown

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Virtual teams play an increasingly important role in the modern economy, and many organizations struggle to overcome the weaknesses inherent in technology-mediated work. Identity communication has been shown to greatly improve individual- and group-level outcomes in offline settings, but these benefits have not been investigated in the context of virtual teams, where mediated interaction can reduce the opportunity for identity communication. Building on prior media theories, we develop and test a model explaining how technology can enable identity communication in virtual settings. Using a controlled experiment (N=186), we test our hypotheses and find strong support for the proposed model. Our study has important implications for researchers seeking to understand identity communication via technology and for practitioners hoping to improve virtual team communication and collaboration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages702-711
Number of pages10
Volume2015-March
ISBN (Print)9781479973675
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 26 2015
Event48th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2015 - Kauai, United States
Duration: Jan 5 2015Jan 8 2015

Other

Other48th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2015
CountryUnited States
CityKauai
Period1/5/151/8/15

Fingerprint

Communication
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Wilson, D. W., Thatcher, S. M. B., & Brown, S. A. (2015). Media capabilities that support identity communication in virtual teams. In Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (Vol. 2015-March, pp. 702-711). [7069739] IEEE Computer Society. https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2015.90

Media capabilities that support identity communication in virtual teams. / Wilson, David W.; Thatcher, Sherry M B; Brown, Susan A.

Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. Vol. 2015-March IEEE Computer Society, 2015. p. 702-711 7069739.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Wilson, DW, Thatcher, SMB & Brown, SA 2015, Media capabilities that support identity communication in virtual teams. in Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. vol. 2015-March, 7069739, IEEE Computer Society, pp. 702-711, 48th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2015, Kauai, United States, 1/5/15. https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2015.90
Wilson DW, Thatcher SMB, Brown SA. Media capabilities that support identity communication in virtual teams. In Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. Vol. 2015-March. IEEE Computer Society. 2015. p. 702-711. 7069739 https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2015.90
Wilson, David W. ; Thatcher, Sherry M B ; Brown, Susan A. / Media capabilities that support identity communication in virtual teams. Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. Vol. 2015-March IEEE Computer Society, 2015. pp. 702-711
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