Media performance and objectivity: Coverage of military intervention in digital and print news

Seth C. Bradshaw, Kate M Kenski, Robert Henderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study adds to the discussion about media objectivity during times of international conflict. Examining media performance in the context of United States policy toward the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, we analyze 512 stories between June 2014 and June 2015, sampling from six leading print and online news outlets. Results show that print and online media outlets tracked together in the early months of the conflict, and online outlets were faster to move away from official sources than print outlets in the months following congressional votes. The difference in source coverage did not equate to a difference in policy coverage between media formats over the course of the year. Coverage of policy justifications was sparse in both formats, though print showed evidence of a downward trend while online coverage was flat throughout the year.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCommunication Research Reports
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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military intervention
objectivity
news
coverage
Sampling
performance
online media
international conflict
print media
Syria
Iraq
voter
trend
evidence

Keywords

  • Content Analysis
  • Foreign Policy
  • Justifications
  • Objectivity
  • Sources

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

Cite this

Media performance and objectivity : Coverage of military intervention in digital and print news. / Bradshaw, Seth C.; Kenski, Kate M; Henderson, Robert.

In: Communication Research Reports, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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