Medical devices of the chest

Tim B. Hunter, Mihra Taljanovic, Pei H. Tsau, William G. Berger, James R. Standen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chest devices are encountered on a daily basis by almost all radiologists. A multitude of extrathoracic materials, from intravenous catheters to oxygen tubing and electrocardiographic leads, frequently overlie the chest, neck, and abdomen. Chest tubes, central venous catheters, endotracheal tubes, and feeding tubes are very common. Cardiac surgery involves the use of many sophisticated devices and procedures, ranging from valve replacement to repair of complex congenital anomalies. Coronary artery bypass surgery is no longer considered unusual, and in many large medical centers, ventricular assist devices and total artificial hearts are frequently encountered. Breast implants are visible at standard chest radiography, and many ancillary devices not intended for treatment of cardiac or thoracic diseases are visible on chest radiographs. New devices are constantly being introduced, but most of them are variations on a previous theme. Knowing the specific name of a device is not important. It is important to recognize the presence of a device and to have an understanding of its function, as well as to recognize the complications associated with its use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1725-1746
Number of pages22
JournalRadiographics
Volume24
Issue number6
StatePublished - Nov 2004

Fingerprint

Thorax
Equipment and Supplies
Thoracic Diseases
Breast Implants
Artificial Heart
Chest Tubes
Heart-Assist Devices
Central Venous Catheters
Enteral Nutrition
Radiography
Coronary Artery Bypass
Abdomen
Thoracic Surgery
Names
Heart Diseases
Neck
Catheters
Oxygen
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Coronary vessels, stems and prostheses, 54.45
  • Heart, pacemakers, 50.11, 50.45
  • Heart, prostheses, 50.11, 50.45
  • Thorax, radiography, 60.461

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Hunter, T. B., Taljanovic, M., Tsau, P. H., Berger, W. G., & Standen, J. R. (2004). Medical devices of the chest. Radiographics, 24(6), 1725-1746.

Medical devices of the chest. / Hunter, Tim B.; Taljanovic, Mihra; Tsau, Pei H.; Berger, William G.; Standen, James R.

In: Radiographics, Vol. 24, No. 6, 11.2004, p. 1725-1746.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hunter, TB, Taljanovic, M, Tsau, PH, Berger, WG & Standen, JR 2004, 'Medical devices of the chest', Radiographics, vol. 24, no. 6, pp. 1725-1746.
Hunter TB, Taljanovic M, Tsau PH, Berger WG, Standen JR. Medical devices of the chest. Radiographics. 2004 Nov;24(6):1725-1746.
Hunter, Tim B. ; Taljanovic, Mihra ; Tsau, Pei H. ; Berger, William G. ; Standen, James R. / Medical devices of the chest. In: Radiographics. 2004 ; Vol. 24, No. 6. pp. 1725-1746.
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