Memory issues pertaining to social marketing messages about behavior enactment versus non-enactment

Dan Freeman, Stewart Shapiro, Merrie Brucks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article examines efficiency issues pertaining to social marketing messages about behavior enactment (e.g., smoker) vs. non-enactment (e.g., nonsmoker). Building on a wealth of psycholinguistics research, we posit that underlying differences in the processing and storage of word concepts with affixal negations affect learning and memory for these concepts (i.e., associations with non-enactment concepts will be harder to learn and remember than associations with enactment concepts). Two experiments support our predictions, suggesting that messages about enactment will demonstrate superior efficiency. Implications of study findings are discussed in terms of possibilities for improving the efficiency of social marketing messages about non-enactment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)629-642
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Consumer Psychology
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2009

Keywords

  • Affixal negation
  • Communication effects
  • Memory
  • Social marketing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Marketing

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