Memory pieces and footprints

Multivocality and the meanings of ancient times and ancestral places among the Zuni and Hopi

Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Thomas J Ferguson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The notion of the "contested past" has grown to be an important topic in anthropological research in recent decades, linking such themes as nationalism, identity, museology, tourism, and war. In North America, these discussions have largely centered on archaeology's shifting relationship with native peoples. As scholars give new attention to how research methodologies and representation of cultural histories affect indigenous peoples, it is critical to understand the unique ways in which Native Americans view their past. Contemporary Zuni and Hopi interpretations of ancestral landscapes in the San Pedro Valley of Arizona are used to explore how indigenous worldviews imbue ancient places with deep cultural and individual meanings. This research, based on a three-year collaborative ethnohistory project, argues for resolution to the "contested past" by incorporating a perspective of multivocality, which will enable the creation of alternative histories that do not eschew scientific principles while respecting native values of history.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)148-162
Number of pages15
JournalAmerican Anthropologist
Volume108
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2006

Fingerprint

cultural history
history
worldview
archaeology
nationalism
Tourism
interpretation
methodology
time
World View
Nationalism
History
Archaeology
Alternative History
Multivocality
Museology
Cultural History
Native People
Ethnohistory
Indigenous Peoples

Keywords

  • Archaeological landscape
  • Historical knowledge
  • Hopi
  • Zuni

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology

Cite this

Memory pieces and footprints : Multivocality and the meanings of ancient times and ancestral places among the Zuni and Hopi. / Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Chip; Ferguson, Thomas J.

In: American Anthropologist, Vol. 108, No. 1, 03.2006, p. 148-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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