Mental Health Diagnoses in Patients With Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome and Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome: A Case/Control Study

J. Quentin Clemens, Sheila O. Brown, Elizabeth Calhoun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

97 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We compared the rate of mental health disorders in male and female patients with pelvic pain and control subjects. Materials and Methods: Male patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (174) and female patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (111) were identified from a urology tertiary care clinic population. A control group consisting of 72 men and 175 women was also recruited. Subjects completed self-administered questionnaires that included items about demographics, medical history, medication use and urological symptoms. The Patient Health Questionnaire was used to identify depression and panic disorder. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine odds ratios for the presence of a mental health diagnosis. Results: Mental health disorders were identified in 13% of the chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome cases and 4% of male controls (OR 2.0, p = 0.04), as well as in 23% of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome cases and 3% of female controls (OR 8.2, p <0.0001). Disease status (case vs control) (OR 10.4, p = 0.001) and income greater than $50,000 (OR 0.34, p = 0.008) were the only 2 variables independently predictive of the presence of a mental health diagnosis. Age, gender, race/ethnicity and education were not predictive. Medications for anxiety, depression or stress were being taken by 18% of patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, 37% of those with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, 7% of male controls and 13% of female controls. Conclusions: Depression and panic disorder are significantly more common in men and women with pelvic pain conditions than in controls. Medication use data suggest that anxiety and depression may be more difficult to treat in patients with urological pain syndromes than in controls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1378-1382
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume180
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Interstitial Cystitis
Prostatitis
Pelvic Pain
Chronic Pain
Case-Control Studies
Mental Health
Depression
Panic Disorder
Mental Disorders
Anxiety
Urology
Tertiary Healthcare
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Demography
Education
Pain
Control Groups
Health
Population

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • depression
  • panic disorder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Mental Health Diagnoses in Patients With Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome and Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome : A Case/Control Study. / Clemens, J. Quentin; Brown, Sheila O.; Calhoun, Elizabeth.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 180, No. 4, 10.2008, p. 1378-1382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: We compared the rate of mental health disorders in male and female patients with pelvic pain and control subjects. Materials and Methods: Male patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (174) and female patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (111) were identified from a urology tertiary care clinic population. A control group consisting of 72 men and 175 women was also recruited. Subjects completed self-administered questionnaires that included items about demographics, medical history, medication use and urological symptoms. The Patient Health Questionnaire was used to identify depression and panic disorder. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine odds ratios for the presence of a mental health diagnosis. Results: Mental health disorders were identified in 13{\%} of the chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome cases and 4{\%} of male controls (OR 2.0, p = 0.04), as well as in 23{\%} of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome cases and 3{\%} of female controls (OR 8.2, p <0.0001). Disease status (case vs control) (OR 10.4, p = 0.001) and income greater than $50,000 (OR 0.34, p = 0.008) were the only 2 variables independently predictive of the presence of a mental health diagnosis. Age, gender, race/ethnicity and education were not predictive. Medications for anxiety, depression or stress were being taken by 18{\%} of patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, 37{\%} of those with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, 7{\%} of male controls and 13{\%} of female controls. Conclusions: Depression and panic disorder are significantly more common in men and women with pelvic pain conditions than in controls. Medication use data suggest that anxiety and depression may be more difficult to treat in patients with urological pain syndromes than in controls.",
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