Mental imagery increases self-determined motivation to exercise with university enrolled women: A randomized controlled trial using a peer-based intervention

Peter Giacobbi, Karen A. Dreisbach, Nicole M. Thurlow, Payal Anand, Francisco Garcia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a peer-based mental imagery intervention on the self-determined motivation and cardio-respiratory fitness of university enrolled women. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Method: 43 University enrolled women were randomized to peer-mentored or peer-mentored plus mental imagery conditions while 32 completed three meetings with peer-mentors and post-testing (Mage=19.91; SD=1.70). Results: Significant improvements in cardio-respiratory endurance, ratings of perceived endurance, and self-determined motivation to exercise were observed across both study conditions. Participants assigned to the peer mentored plus mental imagery condition reported significantly greater increases in self-determined motivation to exercise at post-test compared to those in the peer-mentored condition. Conclusions: Peer-based interventions are a viable way to improve fitness and health outcomes while mental imagery appears to be associated with increases in autonomous forms of exercise motivation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)374-381
Number of pages8
JournalPsychology of Sport and Exercise
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014

Keywords

  • Exercise
  • Mental imagery
  • Self-determination theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Mental imagery increases self-determined motivation to exercise with university enrolled women: A randomized controlled trial using a peer-based intervention'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this