Messy, Butch, and Queer: LGBTQ Youth and the School-to-Prison Pipeline

Shannon D. Snapp, Jennifer M. Hoenig, Amanda Fields, Stephen T Russell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Emerging evidence suggests that lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth experience disparate treatment in schools that may result in criminal sanctions. In an effort to understand the pathways that push youth out of schools, we conducted focus groups with youth (n = 31) from Arizona, California, and Georgia, and we interviewed adult advocates from across the United States (n = 19). Independent coders used MAXQDA to organize and code data. We found that LGBTQ youth are punished for public displays of affection and violating gender norms. Youth often experience a hostile school climate, may fight to protect themselves, and are frequently blamed for their own victimization. Family rejection and homelessness facilitate entry in the school-to-prison pipeline. Narratives highlight new opportunities to challenge inequity in schools.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-82
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Adolescent Research
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 19 2015

Fingerprint

Transgender Persons
Prisons
correctional institution
school
school climate
Homeless Persons
homelessness
sympathy
Crime Victims
sanction
victimization
Focus Groups
Climate
experience
Sexual Minorities
narrative
gender
evidence
Group

Keywords

  • Bullying
  • Intersectionality
  • LGBTQ youth
  • School discipline
  • School-to-prison pipeline
  • Victimization
  • Zero-tolerance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Messy, Butch, and Queer : LGBTQ Youth and the School-to-Prison Pipeline. / Snapp, Shannon D.; Hoenig, Jennifer M.; Fields, Amanda; Russell, Stephen T.

In: Journal of Adolescent Research, Vol. 30, No. 1, 19.01.2015, p. 57-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Snapp, Shannon D. ; Hoenig, Jennifer M. ; Fields, Amanda ; Russell, Stephen T. / Messy, Butch, and Queer : LGBTQ Youth and the School-to-Prison Pipeline. In: Journal of Adolescent Research. 2015 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 57-82.
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