Metamorphosis of the insect nervous system

Changes in morphology and synaptic interactions of identified neurones

Richard B Levine, James W. Truman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

119 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The nervous system of holometabolous insects directs the behaviour of three radically different stages, the larva, pupa and adult. In some cases, larval neurones degenerate during metamorphosis and are replaced in the adult by neurones derived from retained embryonic neuroblasts1,2, but many larval neurones are retained and undergo a morphological and synaptic reorganization which allows them to perform new functions in the adult 3,4. This cellular rearrangement, however, creates a problem in that the developing adults continue to display pupal-like behaviour even after the neurones attain their adult form. We show here that in the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, the adult function of a neurone is prevented from being expressed precociously by the persistence of inhibitory influences that are removed abruptly at adult emergence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)250-252
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume299
Issue number5880
DOIs
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

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Nervous System
Insects
Neurons
Manduca
Pupa
Larva

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Metamorphosis of the insect nervous system : Changes in morphology and synaptic interactions of identified neurones. / Levine, Richard B; Truman, James W.

In: Nature, Vol. 299, No. 5880, 1982, p. 250-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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