Mexican americans and historical trauma theory

A theoretical perspective

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The observed intergenerational stress response to negative social and historical events is at the core of historical trauma theory, which has been applied to Native Americans, African Americans, and Pacific Islanders, among others. The historical and social experiences of the Mexican population living in the United States have many parallels that lend themselves to the application of historical trauma theory to macro-level and micro-level influences on access to health care, physical health status, and mental health status, including substance abuse among Mexican Americans. This article highlights the legacy of Spanish colonialism and Anglo-American neo-colonialism on Mexicans and Mexican Americans in the southwestern United States through a potential application of historical trauma theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)330-340
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009

Fingerprint

Colonialism
trauma
colonial age
Health Status
health status
Wounds and Injuries
Southwestern United States
Health Services Accessibility
North American Indians
macro level
micro level
African Americans
substance abuse
Substance-Related Disorders
Mental Health
mental health
health care
event
Population
experience

Keywords

  • Historical trauma
  • Mexican Americans
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Mexican americans and historical trauma theory : A theoretical perspective. / Estrada, Antonio L.

In: Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse, Vol. 8, No. 3, 07.2009, p. 330-340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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