Micromechanics of deformation in Topopah Spring tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

Runqi Wang, John M. Kemeny

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Samples of Topopah Spring tuff from Yucca Mountain, Nevada have been tested and analyzed. Laboratory tests conducted include standard uniaxial and triaxial compression tests, and special 'damage' tests in which samples are loaded to some proportion of their strength and analyzed with SEM microscopy. Based on the SEM analysis of the damaged samples, the micromechanics of rock deformation and failure in Topopah Spring tuff is determined. The results indicated that pores are the major initial microstructures in Topopah Spring tuff. Also, several mechanisms have been found for microcracking under compressive stresses, including pore crackling, the linking of pore cracks, and the formation of en echelon arrays of axial cracks. The macroscopic cracks tend to propagate in the locations with the highest pore density. The final failure of Topopah Spring tuff is due to shear localization near the peak stress. The microbuckling of crack-induced columns has been found to be the major mechanism for inducing shear localization. The heating of Topopah Spring specimens up to 200°C results in no significant microcracking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHigh Level Radioactive Waste Management
PublisherPubl by ASCE
Pages1873-1879
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)0872629503
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
EventProceedings of the 4th Annual International Conference on High Level Radioactive Waste Management - Las Vegas, NV, USA
Duration: Apr 26 1993Apr 30 1993

Publication series

NameHigh Level Radioactive Waste Management

Other

OtherProceedings of the 4th Annual International Conference on High Level Radioactive Waste Management
CityLas Vegas, NV, USA
Period4/26/934/30/93

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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