Microwave-plasma dry-etch for fabrication of conducting polymer microelectrodes

Richard F. Vreeland, Nicholas D. Laude, Sean M. Lambert, Michael L Heien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An inexpensive dry etch technology based on a low-pressure microwave plasma generated in a countertop microwave oven is characterized for the patterning of a conductive polymer microelectrode. The etch process is described, and the microwave-generated plasma is characterized by emission spectroscopy. The plasma is generated with an atmospheric mixture of mostly nitrogen and oxygen. A 10 μm wide band microelectrode composed of PEDOT:Tosylate, an optically transparent conductive polymer, is fabricated on a plastic substrate. Conductive polymer etch rates are approximately 280-300 nm/minute. A patterned microelectrode is characterized by atomic force microscopy. The horizontal distance of a 10-90% height of a plasma-etched 150 nm thick electrode was measured to be 360 ± 200 nm (n = 5). Electrodes are further characterized using steady-state cyclic voltammetry, and they have an electroactive area congruent with their geometric area. Finally, a complete device is assembled and used as a separation platform for biogenic amines. A microwave-etched 250 μm PEDOT:PSS electrode is employed for end-channel electrochemical detection on this microchip, where an electrophoretic separation of dopamine and catechol and a micellar electrokinetic chromatography separation of dopamine and serotonin are performed. Both mass and concentration LODs are comparable to other electrochemical detectors in an end-channel configuration. With the added advantages of easy processing, robustness, optical transparency, and low cost, we expect microwave-etched polymer films to be a viable alternative to traditional electrodes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1385-1390
Number of pages6
JournalAnalytical Chemistry
Volume86
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 4 2014

Fingerprint

Microelectrodes
Conducting polymers
Microwaves
Plasmas
Fabrication
Polymers
Electrodes
Dopamine
Microwave ovens
Biogenic Amines
Emission spectroscopy
Chromatography
Polymer films
Transparency
Cyclic voltammetry
Atomic force microscopy
Serotonin
Nitrogen
Oxygen
Plastics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry

Cite this

Microwave-plasma dry-etch for fabrication of conducting polymer microelectrodes. / Vreeland, Richard F.; Laude, Nicholas D.; Lambert, Sean M.; Heien, Michael L.

In: Analytical Chemistry, Vol. 86, No. 3, 04.02.2014, p. 1385-1390.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vreeland, Richard F. ; Laude, Nicholas D. ; Lambert, Sean M. ; Heien, Michael L. / Microwave-plasma dry-etch for fabrication of conducting polymer microelectrodes. In: Analytical Chemistry. 2014 ; Vol. 86, No. 3. pp. 1385-1390.
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