Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Improves Emotional Reactivity to Social Stress: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial

Willoughby B. Britton, Ben Shahar, Ohad Szepsenwol, William J Jacobs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

97 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The high likelihood of recurrence in depression is linked to a progressive increase in emotional reactivity to stress (stress sensitization). Mindfulness-based therapies teach mindfulness skills designed to decrease emotional reactivity in the face of negative affect-producing stressors. The primary aim of the current study was to assess whether Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) is efficacious in reducing emotional reactivity to social evaluative threat in a clinical sample with recurrent depression. A secondary aim was to assess whether improvement in emotional reactivity mediates improvements in depressive symptoms. Fifty-two individuals with partially remitted depression were randomized into an 8-week MBCT course or a waitlist control condition. All participants underwent the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) before and after the 8-week trial period. Emotional reactivity to stress was assessed with the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory at several time points before, during, and after the stressor. MBCT was associated with decreased emotional reactivity to social stress, specifically during the recovery (post-stressor) phase of the TSST. Waitlist controls showed an increase in anticipatory (pre-stressor) anxiety that was absent in the MBCT group. Improvements in emotional reactivity partially mediated improvements in depressive symptoms. Limitations include small sample size, lack of objective or treatment adherence measures, and non-generalizability to more severely depressed populations. Given that emotional reactivity to stress is an important psychopathological process underlying the chronic and recurrent nature of depression, these findings suggest that mindfulness skills are important in adaptive emotion regulation when coping with stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)365-380
Number of pages16
JournalBehavior Therapy
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

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Mindfulness
Cognitive Therapy
Randomized Controlled Trials
Depression
Exercise Test
Anxiety
Sample Size
Emotions
Recurrence
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Emotional reactivity
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy
  • Trier social stress test

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Improves Emotional Reactivity to Social Stress : Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial. / Britton, Willoughby B.; Shahar, Ben; Szepsenwol, Ohad; Jacobs, William J.

In: Behavior Therapy, Vol. 43, No. 2, 06.2012, p. 365-380.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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