Mineralization responses at near-zero temperatures in three alpine soils

Amy E. Miller, Joshua P. Schimel, James O. Sickman, Thomas Meixner, Allen P. Doyle, John M. Melack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cold-season processes are known to contribute substantially to annual carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) budgets in continental high elevation and high-latitude soils, but their role in more temperate alpine ecosystems has seldom been characterized. We used a 4-month lab incubation to describe temperature (-2, 0, 5°C) and moisture [50, 90% water-holding capacity (WHC)] effects on soil C and N dynamics in two wet and one dry meadow soil from the Sierra Nevada, California. The soils varied in their capacity to process N at and below 0°C. Only the dry meadow soil mineralized N at -2°C, but the wet meadow soils switched from net N consumption at -2°C to net N mineralization at temperatures ≥0°C. When the latter soils were incubated at -2°C at either moisture level (50 or 90% WHC), net NO3 - production decreased even as NH4 + continued to accumulate. The same pattern occurred in saturated (90% WHC) soils at warmer temperatures (≥0°C), suggesting that dissimilatory processes could control N cycling in these soils when they are frozen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-245
Number of pages13
JournalBiogeochemistry
Volume84
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

Fingerprint

mineralization
Soils
soil
temperature
Temperature
meadow
Water
Moisture
moisture
water
Ecosystems
Process control
Nitrogen
Carbon
incubation
ecosystem
nitrogen
carbon

Keywords

  • Ammonification
  • Cold-season processes
  • Nitrate consumption
  • Nitrogen
  • Sierra Nevada
  • Soil moisture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Miller, A. E., Schimel, J. P., Sickman, J. O., Meixner, T., Doyle, A. P., & Melack, J. M. (2007). Mineralization responses at near-zero temperatures in three alpine soils. Biogeochemistry, 84(3), 233-245. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10533-007-9112-4

Mineralization responses at near-zero temperatures in three alpine soils. / Miller, Amy E.; Schimel, Joshua P.; Sickman, James O.; Meixner, Thomas; Doyle, Allen P.; Melack, John M.

In: Biogeochemistry, Vol. 84, No. 3, 07.2007, p. 233-245.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, AE, Schimel, JP, Sickman, JO, Meixner, T, Doyle, AP & Melack, JM 2007, 'Mineralization responses at near-zero temperatures in three alpine soils', Biogeochemistry, vol. 84, no. 3, pp. 233-245. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10533-007-9112-4
Miller, Amy E. ; Schimel, Joshua P. ; Sickman, James O. ; Meixner, Thomas ; Doyle, Allen P. ; Melack, John M. / Mineralization responses at near-zero temperatures in three alpine soils. In: Biogeochemistry. 2007 ; Vol. 84, No. 3. pp. 233-245.
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