Modeling atmospheric dust for a public health decision support system

Stanley Morain, Amelia Budge, Thomas Budge, Shirley Baros, Karl Benedict, William Hudspeth, Chandra Bales, Gary Sanchez, William A Sprigg, Dazhong Yin, Brian Barbaris, Beena Chandy, Slobodon Nickovic, Susan Caskey, James Speer, James Bradbury

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Environmental health and public health are often linked in the scientific and popular literature even though they require different scientific skill sets, technologies, and models for their study. Environmental health includes not only the health and sustainability of natural ecosystems, but the environments of built landscapes, home and building environments, and of the Earth system processes that promote or retard environmental change. To study them, one needs education in atmospheric physics and chemistry, water chemistry, geophysics, and biology. Public health is related in large measure to degraded environmental parameters (mostly induced by modern economic, social, and human pressures on landscapes). To study public health, one needs medical training and an appreciation of those processes that impact environments and that may in turn influence populations whose health might be at risk. Using satellite-acquired data and imagery to study environmental health has many immediate attractions; however, the extension of these studies for better understanding public health patterns and outcomes lags far behind, and does not yet embrace medical communities. This paper describes an engineering system for linking atmospheric dust episodes to specific public health outcomes that can be verified and validated in medical terms. It requires forging new scientific partnerships from the environmental and medical professions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings, 31st International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, ISRSE 2005: Global Monitoring for Sustainability and Security
StatePublished - 2005
Event31st International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, ISRSE 2005: Global Monitoring for Sustainability and Security - St. Petersburg, Russian Federation
Duration: Jun 20 2005Jun 24 2005

Other

Other31st International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, ISRSE 2005: Global Monitoring for Sustainability and Security
CountryRussian Federation
CitySt. Petersburg
Period6/20/056/24/05

Fingerprint

Public health
Decision support systems
Dust
Health
Geophysics
Forging
Systems engineering
Ecosystems
Sustainable development
Physics
Education
Earth (planet)
Satellites
Economics
Water

Keywords

  • Engineering
  • Environment
  • Modeling
  • Pollution
  • Prediction
  • Public health
  • Remote sensing
  • Weather

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Environmental Engineering

Cite this

Morain, S., Budge, A., Budge, T., Baros, S., Benedict, K., Hudspeth, W., ... Bradbury, J. (2005). Modeling atmospheric dust for a public health decision support system. In Proceedings, 31st International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, ISRSE 2005: Global Monitoring for Sustainability and Security

Modeling atmospheric dust for a public health decision support system. / Morain, Stanley; Budge, Amelia; Budge, Thomas; Baros, Shirley; Benedict, Karl; Hudspeth, William; Bales, Chandra; Sanchez, Gary; Sprigg, William A; Yin, Dazhong; Barbaris, Brian; Chandy, Beena; Nickovic, Slobodon; Caskey, Susan; Speer, James; Bradbury, James.

Proceedings, 31st International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, ISRSE 2005: Global Monitoring for Sustainability and Security. 2005.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Morain, S, Budge, A, Budge, T, Baros, S, Benedict, K, Hudspeth, W, Bales, C, Sanchez, G, Sprigg, WA, Yin, D, Barbaris, B, Chandy, B, Nickovic, S, Caskey, S, Speer, J & Bradbury, J 2005, Modeling atmospheric dust for a public health decision support system. in Proceedings, 31st International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, ISRSE 2005: Global Monitoring for Sustainability and Security. 31st International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, ISRSE 2005: Global Monitoring for Sustainability and Security, St. Petersburg, Russian Federation, 6/20/05.
Morain S, Budge A, Budge T, Baros S, Benedict K, Hudspeth W et al. Modeling atmospheric dust for a public health decision support system. In Proceedings, 31st International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, ISRSE 2005: Global Monitoring for Sustainability and Security. 2005
Morain, Stanley ; Budge, Amelia ; Budge, Thomas ; Baros, Shirley ; Benedict, Karl ; Hudspeth, William ; Bales, Chandra ; Sanchez, Gary ; Sprigg, William A ; Yin, Dazhong ; Barbaris, Brian ; Chandy, Beena ; Nickovic, Slobodon ; Caskey, Susan ; Speer, James ; Bradbury, James. / Modeling atmospheric dust for a public health decision support system. Proceedings, 31st International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, ISRSE 2005: Global Monitoring for Sustainability and Security. 2005.
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