Modeling of autism genetic variations in mice: Focusing on synaptic and microcircuit dysfunctions

Shenfeng Qiu, Kimberly A. Aldinger, Pat Levitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders that are characterized by deficits in social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication, and restrictive interests and repetitive behaviors. While human genetic studies have revealed marked heritability in ASD, it has been challenging to translate this genetic risk into a biological mechanism that influences brain development relevant to the disorder phenotypes. This is partly due to the complex genetic architecture of ASD, which involves de novo gene mutations, genomic abnormalities, and common genetic variants. Rather than trying to reconstitute the clinical disorder, using genetic model animals to examine specific features of core ASD pathophysiology offers unique opportunities for refining our understanding of neurodevelopmental mechanisms in ASD. A variety of ASD-relevant phenotypes can now be investigated in rodents, including stereotyped and repetitive behaviors, and deficits in social interaction and communication. In this review, we focus on several prevailing mouse models and discuss how studies have advanced our understanding of synaptic mechanisms that may underlie ASD pathophysiology. Although synaptic perturbations are not the only alterations relevant for ASD, we reason that understanding the synaptic underpinnings of ASD using mouse models may provide mechanistic insights into its etiology and lead to novel therapeutic and interventional strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-100
Number of pages13
JournalDevelopmental Neuroscience
Volume34
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Autistic Disorder
Interpersonal Relations
Nonverbal Communication
Stereotyped Behavior
Phenotype
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Genetic Models
Medical Genetics
Rodentia
Communication
Mutation
Brain

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Chromosomal abnormality
  • Copy number variation
  • Genetic mutation
  • Mouse
  • Neural development
  • Synaptic dysfunction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

Modeling of autism genetic variations in mice : Focusing on synaptic and microcircuit dysfunctions. / Qiu, Shenfeng; Aldinger, Kimberly A.; Levitt, Pat.

In: Developmental Neuroscience, Vol. 34, No. 2-3, 09.2012, p. 88-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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