Modeling Valley Fever incidence in Arizona using a satellite-derived soil moisture proxy

Patrick Stacy, Andrew Comrie, Stephen Yool

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Valley Fever is caused by inhalation of spores from the soil-dwelling fungus Coccidioides spp. Pima, Pinal, and Maricopa counties, Arizona, have the highest Valley Fever incidence on earth. Despite reported links between climate, habitat, disease timing, and seasonality, relationships between the fungus and its putative affinity to moist soils are poorly understood. We used Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) time series from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensor to compare soil moisture variations with disease incidence. Results suggest moist soils in the early spring, resulting from antecedent winter precipitation, correlate with increased incidence in these counties up to a year later.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-316
Number of pages18
JournalGIScience and Remote Sensing
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

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soil moisture
valley
fungus
modeling
disease incidence
soil
AVHRR
NDVI
seasonality
spore
time series
sensor
winter
climate
habitat
county
dwelling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Modeling Valley Fever incidence in Arizona using a satellite-derived soil moisture proxy. / Stacy, Patrick; Comrie, Andrew; Yool, Stephen.

In: GIScience and Remote Sensing, Vol. 49, No. 2, 01.03.2012, p. 299-316.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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