Modelled distributions and conservation status of the wild relatives of chile peppers (Capsicum L.)

Colin K. Khoury, Daniel Carver, Derek W. Barchenger, Gloria E. Barboza, Maarten van Zonneveld, Robert Jarret, Lynn Bohs, Michael Kantar, Mark Uchanski, Kristin Mercer, Gary Paul Nabhan, Paul W. Bosland, Stephanie L. Greene

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: To fill critical knowledge gaps with regard to the distributions and conservation status of the wild relatives of chile peppers (Capsicum L.). Location: The study covered the potential native ranges of currently recognized wild Capsicum taxa, throughout the Americas. Methods: We modelled the potential distributions of 37 wild taxa in the genus, characterized their ecogeographic niches, assessed their ex situ and in situ conservation status, and performed preliminary threat assessments. Results: We categorize 18 of the taxa as “high priority” for further conservation action as a consequence of a combination of their ex situ and in situ assessments, 17 as “medium priority,” and two as “low priority.” Priorities for resolving gaps in ex situ conservation were determined to be high for 94.6%, and medium or high with regard to increased habitat protection for 64.9% of the taxa. The preliminary threat assessment indicated that six taxa may be critically endangered, three endangered, ten vulnerable, six near threatened and 12 least concern. Main conclusions: Taxonomic richness hot spots, especially along the Atlantic coast of Brazil, in Bolivia and Paraguay, and in the highlands of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela, represent particularly high priority regions for further collecting for ex situ conservation as well as for enhanced habitat conservation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDiversity and Distributions
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

hot peppers
Capsicum
wild relatives
habitat conservation
conservation status
Paraguay
Bolivia
Ecuador
Venezuela
Peru
Colombia
highlands
niches
coasts
Brazil
niche
coast
habitat
ex situ conservation
distribution

Keywords

  • biodiversity conservation
  • Capsicum
  • Chili peppers
  • crop wild relatives
  • plant genetic resources

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Khoury, C. K., Carver, D., Barchenger, D. W., Barboza, G. E., van Zonneveld, M., Jarret, R., ... Greene, S. L. (Accepted/In press). Modelled distributions and conservation status of the wild relatives of chile peppers (Capsicum L.). Diversity and Distributions. https://doi.org/10.1111/ddi.13008

Modelled distributions and conservation status of the wild relatives of chile peppers (Capsicum L.). / Khoury, Colin K.; Carver, Daniel; Barchenger, Derek W.; Barboza, Gloria E.; van Zonneveld, Maarten; Jarret, Robert; Bohs, Lynn; Kantar, Michael; Uchanski, Mark; Mercer, Kristin; Nabhan, Gary Paul; Bosland, Paul W.; Greene, Stephanie L.

In: Diversity and Distributions, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Khoury, CK, Carver, D, Barchenger, DW, Barboza, GE, van Zonneveld, M, Jarret, R, Bohs, L, Kantar, M, Uchanski, M, Mercer, K, Nabhan, GP, Bosland, PW & Greene, SL 2019, 'Modelled distributions and conservation status of the wild relatives of chile peppers (Capsicum L.)', Diversity and Distributions. https://doi.org/10.1111/ddi.13008
Khoury, Colin K. ; Carver, Daniel ; Barchenger, Derek W. ; Barboza, Gloria E. ; van Zonneveld, Maarten ; Jarret, Robert ; Bohs, Lynn ; Kantar, Michael ; Uchanski, Mark ; Mercer, Kristin ; Nabhan, Gary Paul ; Bosland, Paul W. ; Greene, Stephanie L. / Modelled distributions and conservation status of the wild relatives of chile peppers (Capsicum L.). In: Diversity and Distributions. 2019.
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