Modelling astrophysical phenomena in the laboratory with intense lasers

Bruce A. Remington, W David Arnett, R. Paul Drake, Hideaki Takabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

309 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Astrophysical research has traditionally been divided into observations and theoretical modeling or a combination of both. A component sometimes missing has been the ability to quantitatively test the observations and models in an experimental setting where the initial and final states are well characterized. Intense lasers are now being used to recreate aspects of astrophysical phenomena in the laboratory, allowing the creation of experimental test beds where observations and models can be quantitatively compared with laboratory data. Experiments are under development at intense laser facilities to test and refine our understanding of phenomena such as supernovae, supernova remnants, gamma-ray bursts, and giant planets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1488-1493
Number of pages6
JournalScience
Volume284
Issue number5419
DOIs
StatePublished - May 28 1999

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astrophysics
lasers
test stands
supernova remnants
gamma ray bursts
supernovae
planets

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Modelling astrophysical phenomena in the laboratory with intense lasers. / Remington, Bruce A.; Arnett, W David; Drake, R. Paul; Takabe, Hideaki.

In: Science, Vol. 284, No. 5419, 28.05.1999, p. 1488-1493.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Remington, Bruce A. ; Arnett, W David ; Drake, R. Paul ; Takabe, Hideaki. / Modelling astrophysical phenomena in the laboratory with intense lasers. In: Science. 1999 ; Vol. 284, No. 5419. pp. 1488-1493.
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