Molecular analysis of household transmission of Giardia lamblia in a region of high endemicity in Peru

Margarethe A. Cooper, Charles R Sterling, Robert H. Gilman, Vitaliano Cama, Ynes Ortega, Rodney D. Adam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Giardia lamblia is ubiquitous in multiple communities of nonindustrialized nations. Genotypes A1, A2, and B (Nash groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively) are found in humans, whereas genotypes C and D are typically found in dogs. However, genotypes A and B have occasionally been identified in dogs. Methods. Fecal Giardia isolates from 22 families and their dogs, living in Pampas de San Juan, were collected over 7 weeks in 2002 and 6 weeks in 2003. Samples were genotyped, followed by sequencing and haplotyping of many of these isolates by using loci on chromosomes 3 and 5. Results. Human infections were all caused by isolates of genotypes A2 and B. Human coinfections with genotypes A2 and B were common, and the reassortment pattern of different subtypes of A2 isolates supports prior observations that suggested recombination among genotype A2 isolates. All dogs had genotypes C and/or D, with one exception of a dog with a mixed B/D genotype infection. Conclusions. In a region of high endemicity where infected dogs and humans constantly commingle, different genotypes of Giardia are almost always found in dogs and humans, suggesting that zoonotic transmission is very uncommon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1713-1721
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume202
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

Fingerprint

Giardia lamblia
Peru
Genotype
Dogs
varespladib methyl
Giardia
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3
Zoonoses
Infection
Coinfection
Genetic Recombination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology and Allergy

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Molecular analysis of household transmission of Giardia lamblia in a region of high endemicity in Peru. / Cooper, Margarethe A.; Sterling, Charles R; Gilman, Robert H.; Cama, Vitaliano; Ortega, Ynes; Adam, Rodney D.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 202, No. 11, 01.12.2010, p. 1713-1721.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cooper, Margarethe A. ; Sterling, Charles R ; Gilman, Robert H. ; Cama, Vitaliano ; Ortega, Ynes ; Adam, Rodney D. / Molecular analysis of household transmission of Giardia lamblia in a region of high endemicity in Peru. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2010 ; Vol. 202, No. 11. pp. 1713-1721.
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