Molecular characterization of invasive Staphylococcus aureus infection in central New York children: Importance of two clonal groups and inconsistent presence of selected virulence determinants

Manika Suryadevara, Andrew E. Clark, Donna M. Wolk, Aubri Carman, Paula F. Rosenbaum, Jana Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. The genetic makeup of circulating Staphylococcus aureus (SA) populations varies by region. The extent to which SA virulence determinants contribute to the severity of pediatric infections is poorly understood. The study objective was to describe the genetic population of invasive SA (ISA) isolates from children in the Central New York (CNY) area and the prevalence of selected virulence genes. Methods. Clinical and demographic information for hospitalized children <19 years of age with community-onset or community-associated ISA infections, determined from clinical microbiology records, was extracted from medical records from Upstate Golisano Children's Hospital in CNY. Antibiotic susceptibility was assessed, and available isolates were genotyped and tested for the presence of selected virulence determinants. Associations between clinical and laboratory findings were evaluated using standard statistical techniques. Results. Ninety patients with ISA disease diagnosed between 2007 and 2010 were included in the study; 74% were due to methicillin-susceptible SA (MSSA). The most common clinical diagnosis was bacteremia. Fifty-seven of 90 isolates were available for further testing. The SA pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type, agr type, and clonal complexes most commonly isolated were USA300 (n = 25, 44%), agr1 (n = 30, 52%), and CC8 (n = 25, 44%), respectively. USA300 strains were more likely to be associated with deep abscesses (P =.007), whereas non-USA300 strains were associated with medical device infections (P =.018). Isolates from patients with deep abscesses and pneumonia were more likely to carry luk-PV genes (P =.023 and P =.051, respectively). Conclusions. MSSA remains an important problem of pediatric ISA infection in our region and results from genetically diverse SA populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberpis087
Pages (from-to)30-39
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

Keywords

  • Children
  • Invasive
  • MRSA
  • MSSA
  • S aureus
  • USA300
  • Virulence determinants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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