Multiple genetic aberrations including evidence of chromosome 11q13 rearrangement detected in pituitary adenomas by comparative genomic hybridization

Andrew K. Metzger, Gayatry Mohapatra, Yuriko A. Minn, Andrew W. Bollen, Kathleen Lamborn, Frederic M. Waldman, Charles B. Wilson, Burt G.F. Feuerstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Object. This study was conducted to determine whether comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a more sensitive method for detecting genetic aberrations than other tests currently in use. Methods. The authors used CGH to examine 40 primary and 13 recurrent adenomas obtained from 52 patients for loss and gain of genetic material. Copy number aberrations (CNAs) were detected in 25 (48%) of the 52 patients studied. The chromosomes affected were, in order of decreasing frequency, 11, 7, X, 1, 8, 13, 5, 14, 2, 6, 9, 10, 12, 3, 18, 21, 4, 16, 15, 19, 22, and Y. Endocrinologically active adenomas were more likely to contain (p = 0.009) and had a greater number (p = 0.003) of CNAs. Of 26 adenomas with CNAs, 18 showed multiple aberrations involving entire chromosomes or chromosome arms. The most frequent CNA involving a chromosome subregion, which was present in four (8%) of 53 adenomas, was the loss of all chromosome 11 material except for a preserved common segment containing 1lq13. Immunoperoxidase staining did not detect cyclin D1 expression in those four cases, making cyclin D1 an unlikely target of this rearrangement. Conclusions. These findings indicate that genetic abnormalities are present in pituitary adenomas at a higher rate than previously reported, are associated with endocrinological activity, and often involve several chromosomes. Rearrangement at 11q13 may inactivate a tumor suppressor gene or activate an oncogene that is important in the initiation or progression of sporadic pituitary adenomas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)306-314
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume90
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Comparative Genomic Hybridization
Pituitary Neoplasms
Chromosomes
Adenoma
Cyclin D1
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11
Tumor Suppressor Genes
Oncogenes
Staining and Labeling
Genes

Keywords

  • Chromosome 11q13 rearrangement
  • Comparative genomic hybridization
  • Genetic aberration
  • Pituitary adenoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Multiple genetic aberrations including evidence of chromosome 11q13 rearrangement detected in pituitary adenomas by comparative genomic hybridization. / Metzger, Andrew K.; Mohapatra, Gayatry; Minn, Yuriko A.; Bollen, Andrew W.; Lamborn, Kathleen; Waldman, Frederic M.; Wilson, Charles B.; Feuerstein, Burt G.F.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 90, No. 2, 02.1999, p. 306-314.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Metzger, Andrew K. ; Mohapatra, Gayatry ; Minn, Yuriko A. ; Bollen, Andrew W. ; Lamborn, Kathleen ; Waldman, Frederic M. ; Wilson, Charles B. ; Feuerstein, Burt G.F. / Multiple genetic aberrations including evidence of chromosome 11q13 rearrangement detected in pituitary adenomas by comparative genomic hybridization. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 1999 ; Vol. 90, No. 2. pp. 306-314.
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abstract = "Object. This study was conducted to determine whether comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a more sensitive method for detecting genetic aberrations than other tests currently in use. Methods. The authors used CGH to examine 40 primary and 13 recurrent adenomas obtained from 52 patients for loss and gain of genetic material. Copy number aberrations (CNAs) were detected in 25 (48{\%}) of the 52 patients studied. The chromosomes affected were, in order of decreasing frequency, 11, 7, X, 1, 8, 13, 5, 14, 2, 6, 9, 10, 12, 3, 18, 21, 4, 16, 15, 19, 22, and Y. Endocrinologically active adenomas were more likely to contain (p = 0.009) and had a greater number (p = 0.003) of CNAs. Of 26 adenomas with CNAs, 18 showed multiple aberrations involving entire chromosomes or chromosome arms. The most frequent CNA involving a chromosome subregion, which was present in four (8{\%}) of 53 adenomas, was the loss of all chromosome 11 material except for a preserved common segment containing 1lq13. Immunoperoxidase staining did not detect cyclin D1 expression in those four cases, making cyclin D1 an unlikely target of this rearrangement. Conclusions. These findings indicate that genetic abnormalities are present in pituitary adenomas at a higher rate than previously reported, are associated with endocrinological activity, and often involve several chromosomes. Rearrangement at 11q13 may inactivate a tumor suppressor gene or activate an oncogene that is important in the initiation or progression of sporadic pituitary adenomas.",
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AU - Mohapatra, Gayatry

AU - Minn, Yuriko A.

AU - Bollen, Andrew W.

AU - Lamborn, Kathleen

AU - Waldman, Frederic M.

AU - Wilson, Charles B.

AU - Feuerstein, Burt G.F.

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